"I have a dream" by Martin Luther King, Jr.

King, Obama, and Healthcare

 

Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Day 

The  United States observes the third Monday of January as a federal holiday in honor and memory of the birthday of the late Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr. (January 15, 1929)

The Reverend Dr. King led the Civil Rights Movement in the United States from the mid-1950s until his death by assassination in 1968.

First African-American President- Barack Obama

In 2008 Democratic candidate Barack Obama ran for President of the United States and won, becoming the 44th President  and the first African-American to win the office.

Former President Obama running with his dog

President Obama kept fit exercising with his dog- photo compliments Pixabay 

 

Candidate Obama  pledged to enact universal health care coverage for the country, a promise President Obama fulfilled with the support of a Democratic Congress. The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, often shortened to the Affordable Care Act (ACA) or nicknamed Obamacare, is a United States federal statute enacted by the 111th United States Congress and signed into law by President Barack Obama on March 23, 2010.

 

 

First Universal Healthcare Coverage -“Obamacare”

The term “Obamacare” was first used by opponents, then embraced by supporters, and eventually used by President Obama himself. Together with the Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010 amendment, it represents the U.S. healthcare system‘s most significant overhaul and expansion of coverage since  Medicare and Medicaid in 1965. (source Wikipedia) 

 

Is ObamaCare doomed?

Donald Trump’s presidential campaign platform included health care reform, a plan he labeled “repeal and replace” for Obamacare. Thus far, as of January 2018 , President Trump has not convinced Congress to abandon Obamacare, but it will change under the recently passed tax law which has abolished the individual mandate  requiring all persons to either buy health insurance or pay a penalty. Premiums are predicted to increase significantly, making it more difficult for people to afford coverage.

 

 African-American Health- Progress Made, More Needed

 

The death rate for African Americans dropped 25% from 1999-2015, but they are still more likely to die at a young age than white Americans.

African Americans in their 20s, 30s, and 40s are more likely to live with or die from conditions that typically occur at older ages in whites, including

  • heart disease,
  • stroke, and
  • diabetes.

African Americans ages 35-64 are 50 percent more likely to have high blood pressure as whites.

African Americans ages 18 to 49 years are 2 times as likely to die from heart disease as whites.

Social and economic conditions, such as poverty, contribute to the gap in health differences between African Americans and whites.

 

Public health agencies and community organizations should work with other community resources , including

  • education,
  • business,
  • transportation, and
  • housing,

to create social and economic conditions that promote health at early ages.

Consumers can prevent disease and early death by

 

Dr. Ben Carson- “Gifted Hands”

Ben Carson, M.D., renowned neurosurgeon, also ran for President in 2016 , leaving the campaign during the Republican primary.

 

President Trump appointed him to his Cabinet where he serves as the 17th Secretary of the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development.

 

 

 

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I invite you to  follow Watercress Words for more information and inspiration to help you explore the HEART of HEALTH.

Thanks for your time and interest.  Dr. Aletha 

 

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man with hands folded in prayer

Remembering Dr. King’s dream

Isaiah 40:4-5, NIV

Every valley shall be raised up,
    every mountain and hill made low;
the rough ground shall become level,
    the rugged places a plain.
And the glory of the Lord will be revealed,
    and all people will see it together.

Holy Bible, New International Version®, NIV® Copyright ©1973, 1978, 1984, 2011 by Biblica, Inc.® Used by permission. All rights reserved worldwide.

The Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. quoted this scripture passage in his famous speech at the “March on Washington” in 1963.

 

"I have a dream"

Plaque honoring “I have a dream” speech by Dr. King

 

On the third Monday of January, the United States observes Martin Luther King, Jr. Day as an official federal holiday.

The Reverend Dr. King led the Civil Rights Movement in the United States from the mid-1950s until his death by assassination in 1968. His famous “I have a dream” speech, delivered at the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, D.C. is  remembered, read, and recited by people all over the country on the anniversary of his birth each year.

 

nonviolence seeks to win friendship and understanding, quote Martin Luther King

graphic with King quote compliments of Lightstock.com, affiliate link

 

 

 

Learn more about Dr. King and listen to part of his famous speech at  Biography.com

Read the full text of  “I Have A Dream” .

 

The following book suggestions lead to affiliate links which may pay a commission to this blog at no extra cost to you.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Please share this post and follow this blog  for more –

Weekend Words of  faith, hope, and love

Dr. Aletha 

FAITH LOVE HOPE- words created with letter tiles

These three remain, faith, hope and love, and greatest of these is love. 1 Corinthians 13:13

album covers from music by Carole King

Beautiful- remembering the music of Carole King

“You’ve got to get up every morning

With a smile on your face

And show the world all the love in your heart

Then people gonna treat you better

You’re gonna find, yes you will

That you’re beautiful as you feel.”

Beautiful, by Carole King

 

My husband and I enjoyed a date night at the theater watching Beautiful- The Carole King Musical. The play covers the start of Ms. King’s career as a songwriter, including meeting and marrying her songwriting partner Gerry Goffin.

husband-wife couple holding hands in front of poster for Beautiful The Carole King Musical

My husband and I at the theater for Beautiful The Carole King Musical

Together they wrote some of the most successful and memorable songs of the 1960s-1970s including

 

I Feel the Earth Move 

Will you Love Me Tomorrow?

Up On The Roof 

You’ve Got a Friend 

 

Sadly, their marriage was not as successful as their careers due to his infidelity and mental instability which culminated in hospitalization and divorce.

As I watched and heard the story portrayed on the stage  I remembered her memoir which I read and reviewed here. The memoir included this part of her life as well as subsequent years, which often were as turbulent as the ones in the musical.

Here is my review of her memoir –

A Natural Woman: A Memoir

Although Carole King did not write A Natural Womanfor herself (she and her first husband were asked to write it for Aretha Franklin), the song aptly fits her life also.

She grew up in a close Jewish family, attended school where she excelled in performing arts and graduated early. She married young and  loved her husbands (four of them) passionately. She doted on her four children and did all the typical mom things- driving them to activities, homeschooling, sewing their clothes. She cooked food that she grew herself and even milked a goat she owned. She welcomed grandchildren and cared for aging parents.

She could almost be any 70 year old woman- except she is a Grammy award winning singer/songwriter who has written over 100 songs, including many of the greatest hits from the 1970s. In 2013 she became the first woman to be awarded the Library of Congress Gershwin Prize for Popular Song.

inserts from our Carole King music CD collection

inserts from our Carole King music CD collection

 

Ms. King was at the height of her career in 1972 when my husband and I met, and found a mutual appreciation for her music, and still do. So, even though I don’t read memoirs of celebrities, I made an exception this time. I wanted to know more about this talented woman, and I was not disappointed.

As  I listened to the book’s audio version, read by the author,  I marvelled at  how she managed to live such a normal and successful life while experiencing a series of traumatic experiences starting in childhood. These included

  • a sibling with physical and developmental disabilities
  • the dissolution of her parents’ marriage
  • financial instability in her early career
  • the breakdown of her four marriages
  • an extended civil lawsuit
  • accidents resulting in serious physical injury
  • exposure to mental illness and substance abuse

 

The last issue led to two of her divorces, one of which followed several years of verbal and physical abuse .  She candidly admits that she submitted to it,  thinking that  she deserved it, he didn’t mean to hurt her, and that he would change.

Fortunately, one night she  woke up with the conviction that she needed help. Counselling helped her develop personal resources to resist and stop the abuse. She urges women in similar circumstances to seek help and recommends

 The National Domestic Violence Hotline | 24/7 Confidential Support.

 

I am sad that she  experienced such pain in her life, all the while brightening other lives with her music. She said that music helped her cope with the challenges in her life.

Her life reminds us that people who appear successful and accomplished in some areas of life, may be unhappy and hurting in others. We may never know the pain that some have walked through to get where they are.

Carole King insists  she never wanted to be a star or diva, and she zealously guarded her privacy. According to this book, she valued most her family, relationships, writing songs and sharing her music. I am glad she  decided to share this side of her life and the lessons it teaches .  Thank you Carole King.    It's some kind of wonderful! Beautiful The Carole King Musical- poster on window at theater

Here is a selection of Carole King’s music

(these are affiliate links)

Tapestry  Carole King’s first and most successful album

Beautiful: The Carole King Musical  the story of Carole’s life and career

Live at the Troubadour Carole King singing with her friend James Taylor

The Carnegie Hall Concert (Live) June 1971 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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And please follow Watercress Words for more information and inspiration to help you explore the HEART of HEALTH.

Thanks for your time and interest .

Sincerely, Dr. Aletha 

FAITH, HOPE, LOVE in wooden block letters

Blessed to be a kid

Jesus Blesses the Children

Holy Bible, New Living Translation copyright 1996, 2004, 2007 by Tyndale House Foundation. Used by permission of Tyndale House Publishers, Inc., Carol Stream, Illinois, 60188. All rights reserved.

 

 

 

The Complete Illustrated Children's Bible

The Complete Illustrated Children’s Bible  (this is an affiliate link)

 

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(By your signing up through these links, I have a chance to earn free books that I may review for this blog.)

 

This post featured photos from our volunteer trips  to VietNam, El Salvador, Zanzibar, and Mexico.

Please share this post and follow this blog  for more –

Weekend Words of  faith, hope, and love

(1 Corinthians 13:1)

"And now these three remain:faith, hope and love. But the greatest of these is love."

1 Corinthians 13:13, photo from the Lightstock.com collection (affiliate link)

 

Have a blessed week. Dr. Aletha 

The word AUTISM written in vintage letterpress type

Top post of 2017- why the increase in autism?

You’ve heard and read much about autism recently. The top new TV drama this season , The Good Doctor, has a major character with autism (although the actor himself is not).

This illustrates the interest in autism spectrum disorders, and the controversy. We are not certain of the cause, and wonder why the condition is diagnosed more frequently.

Perhaps that explains why this was the most viewed post on this blog in 2017.

Light it up blue-autism speaks

 

 

 

Like other physicians and families of people with autism, I puzzle over the increased number of children and adults diagnosed with autism. Most of us have theories about why we now believe 1 in 68 children have autism spectrum disorders.

People point out that “when they were children” they never knew of anyone with autism. There are those who are absolutely convinced that the increased numbers of autism followed the introduction of the measles-mumps-rubella vaccine, MMR. Others implicate genetics, environmental toxins, diet, and intrauterine brain trauma.

I found an article that offers a sound, well thought out and expressed explanation. It contains several points that I have identified and some I had not.

The article was published in Spectrum whose commitment is “to provide accurate and objective coverage of autism research.” Spectrum is funded by the Simons Foundation Autism Research Initiative. Senior News Writer Jessica Wright, Ph.D. in biological sciences from Stanford University, wrote the report. (Scientific American also published the article by permission.)

In the article, Dr.Wright concludes,

“The bulk of the increase (in autism rates) stems from a growing awareness of autism and changes to the condition’s diagnostic criteria.”

First , let’s consider some terminology. Prevalence is an estimate of how common a disease or condition is in a particular population of people at any given time.

So the prevalence of autism in children would be

the number of children identified as autistic at any given time

divided by  the total number of children alive at that time .

The currently accepted rate of autism is 1 in 68 children, or 1.4 %.

So  autism prevalence depends on children being correctly identified as autistic. At any given time, some autistic children may not be identified, and some may be  incorrectly identified.

We do not have any totally objective tests available for autism yet. There is no blood test, scan, culture, imaging study, DNA test, or  monitor to definitely conclude that autism is or is not present.

 

 

 

 

The definition of and criteria for autism have changed substantially since “infantile autism” was first identified by Leo Kanner over 70 years ago. Since 1980, the diagnosis is based on applying the criteria outlined in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM). In the most recent version, DSM-5, released in 2013, autism, Asperger syndrome, and pervasive developmental disorder, formerly separate, are now a single diagnosis.

Autism Spectrum Disorder is characterized by

  • Persistent deficits in social communication and social interaction across multiple contexts
  • Restricted, repetitive patterns of behavior, interests, or activities
  • Symptoms must be present in the early developmental period (But may not yet be fully expressed or may be modified by learned behavior in later life)
  • Symptoms cause clinically significant impairment in social, occupational, or other important areas of current functioning.
  • These disturbances are not better explained by intellectual disability (intellectual developmental disorder) or global developmental delay.

At this link you may read the full detailed criteria from DSM-5

Diagnostic Criteria for 299.00 Autism Spectrum Disorder

 

When the diagnostic criteria for other diseases change, the prevalence also changes. Examples include diabetes, high cholesterol, high blood pressure, migraine, obesity, depression , even some cancers. So autism is not unique in this regard.

The currently accepted rate of autism, 1 in 68, comes from the Autism and Developmental Disabilities Monitoring Network, established by the CDC in 2000. Children are identified by reviewing health and school records of 8 year olds in selected counties. So possibly some children get missed, and some assigned incorrectly.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Another major milestone in autism awareness occurred in 1991 when the U.S. Department of Education ruled that autistic children qualify for special education services.

 

Parents of children with developmental and intellectual disabilities  have an incentive to secure accurate diagnosis, to qualify their child for services they otherwise might not  have access to.

 

 

Since 2006, the American Academy of Pediatrics recommends routine screening of all children for autism at 18 and 24 months old. Many physicians, psychologists, and therapists believe early intervention improves these children’s chances to do well intellectually and socially.

If we could go back and review records of children 10, 20, or 30 years ago, and apply current diagnostic criteria, would we find less autism than we do today? Perhaps. But such records would likely reflect the understanding of autism at the time, so might still fail to recognize autism, even when present by today’s standards.

The apparent increased number of children with autism seems alarming-some call it an epidemic. It may represent our increased awareness, recognition, and knowledge about this disorder. And while this increase should raise concern, it can lead to increased research, treatment options, and more effective care for autistic persons.

Here is a link to the original article

Autism Rates in the United States Explained

 

 

 

How The Good Doctor became such a hit

“Highmore’s ( actor who plays an autistic surgical resident ) restrained yet not emotionless portrayal has also resonated within the autism community. Shore (the producer) has heard from multiple people who have found the series inspiring, including one mother who told him that her son, who is on the spectrum and has struggled with depression, agreed to resume therapy after watching the first episode.”

 

 

Will you share this post on your social media pages?

And please follow Watercress Words for more information and inspiration to help you explore the HEART of HEALTH.

Thank you for  viewing  the advertisements and using the affiliate links  that fund this blog; with your continued help, we can grow, reach more people, and support worthy causes that bring health and wholeness to people around the world.

Sincerely, Dr. Aletha 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

smart phone, Bible and cup of coffee

Listen to the Daily Audio Bible with me

Here is a new year’s resolution I hope you will try. Listen to or read the Bible with me this year.  There are many ways to read the Bible but I invite you to join me in listening to the Bible at Daily Audio Bible.       It’s easy, fun, and exciting.

IMG_2660.png

 

Brian Hardin reads the Bible every single day- a selection from the Old Testament, New Testament, Psalms, and Proverbs, so that he completes the Bible in one year. He and his team offer a unique Bible reading/listening opportunity.

And Brian doesn’t just read the Bible; he explains it, comments on its relevance to our world today, and encourages us to apply it to our lives and to share its good news with our friends and family.

 

Besides English, several other languages are available, including Spanish, French, Chinese, Arabic, and others.IMG_2660.png

 

There are special versions for KIDS and TEENS,

a daily Psalm and a daily Proverb.

 

 

 

 

 

There are several formats available

 

 

 

                                                           A mobile app

IMG_2662.png

 

 

Web player and Podcast

With some versions, you can also read along while you listen and you can enter your thoughts in a journal.  You can bookmark favorites. It even checks off the episodes you have listened to. Isn’t that helpful? IMG_2663.png

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I’ve been listening for several years, and am especially excited this year because the DAB team has just released this updated version, for which I was honored to be a beta tester.

 

One of the best parts -DAB offers this wonderful opportunity free of charge.

You pay nothing for the app and use of the web site.

Of course, it costs money to produce something of this quality;  generous donations and the sale of books and other items on the website fund the project.

 

 

 

 

So please use the links above to check it out- you have nothing to lose. I’ll check in with you in a few weeks to ask how it’s going or you can let me know now.

Brian Hardin is a music producer,  ordained minister and author of several books including

REFRAME

SNEEZING JESUS

PASSAGES: HOW READING THE BIBLE IN A YEAR WILL CHANGE EVERYTHING FOR YOU

 

 

 

 

 

Will you share this post on your social media pages?

And please follow Watercress Words for more information and inspiration to help you explore the HEART of HEALTH.

Thanks for your time and interest .

Sincerely, Dr. Aletha 

 

 

Light it up blue-autism speaks

Most viewed post #2- Why I have “A Different Way of Seeing Autism”- a book review

I write little about my personal life on this blog, but this post is an exception. I  write book reviews frequently, and this post is one of those.

The book is important to me for both personal and professional reasons, so it seemed a good choice to write about.  I am pleased that it made the top 5 this year.

Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a neurological and developmental disorder that begins early in childhood and lasts throughout a person’s life. It affects how a person acts and interacts with others, communicates, and learns. It includes what used to be known as Asperger syndrome and pervasive developmental disorders.  Due to changes in diagnostic criteria, lack of definitive tests, overlapping symptoms, and missed diagnoses it’s hard to say what the most common developmental disorder is, but autism likely falls within the top 5.

In this post I explained why I have “a different way of seeing autism.”

 

As soon as I started reading Uniquely Human: A Different Way of Seeing Autism, I knew I had found answers to many of my questions and ,more importantly ,fears about autism. The structure of the book parallels my journey with autism.

 

Part 1- understanding autism:

For the majority of my adult life I have understood autism as a physician, which means I understood little. My training and experience as a family physician taught me  the basics of autism, but  little of the treatment and of the condition. My few autistic patients went to    developmental pediatricians , neurologists, psychiatrists,or psychologists so my involvement was  limited to their physical needs.

From my limited exposure to autistic persons, I saw autism as a life altering, disabling , untreatable  condition that disrupted families as they struggled to cope and manage.

a banner reading "aok Walk for Autism

Part 2- living with autism:

My autism understanding and experience changed when I began living with autism- that is, when my 3-year-old grandson was diagnosed as autistic. At 2 years old he was not using words, even though he had been just a few months before. Other changes in his behavior concerned and alarmed me- lack of eye contact, withdrawing from me and his grandfather, ignoring what was happening around him.

Our once happy, friendly baby grandson seemed to disappear.

a cute baby boy

A happy, smiling, social baby boy, before things changed

 

 

I remember the day I sat at my computer searching the internet for “speech delay in toddlers”. The first, as well as the next several references, all returned the same words – “autism spectrum disorders.”

I cried the first of many tears imagining what the future held for our little family.

 

 

toddler

At age 2 years, we all sensed something had changed. Evaluations and therapy soon followed.

 

 

 

 

I started reading books, medical journal articles and autism focus web sites, trying to find something hopeful and helpful to bring to my family’s autism journey. In Uniquely Human I found that help and hope.

 

UNIQUELY HUMAN- A DIFFERENT WAY OF SEEING AUTISM

UNIQUELY HUMAN- A DIFFERENT WAY OF SEEING AUTISM

 

 

 

 

 

Uniquely Human was written by Barry Prizant, Ph.D.

Uniquely Human was published by Simon and Schuster.

According to his official Facebook page, Dr. Prizant is recognized internationally as a scholar in autism spectrum disorders and childhood disabilities.

He is an Adjunct Professor, Brown University, & Director, Childhood Communication Services.

His many honors include

2014 Honors of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association,

2005 Princeton University-Eden Career Award in autism

2013 Divine Neurotypical Award of GRASP.

 

He is married to Dr. Elaine Meyer, an Associate Professor and Director, Center for Professionalism and Ethical Practice in the Harvard Medical School and father of teenage son Noah, a student at Washington University in St. Louis.

In his spare time, Barry plays drums in a rock/blues band, enjoys hiking, fishing and outdoor activities, and is an avid collector of Inuit, Native American and other indigenous art, and antiques.

In his book, Uniquely Human, Dr. Prizant approaches autism from a perspective gained from studying about and treating children with autism for 40 years.

He approaches autism more “how to” rather than “what or why”. He recommends working with the child’s strengths rather than trying to change or cure their weakness.

Much of the “treatment” of autism centers on controlling so-called autistic behaviors. He believes that these behaviors are the way autistic children cope with the challenges of “sensory dysregulation.” We should address the triggers of this dysregulation rather than trying to manipulate the behavior, he says.

 

 

“The central challenge of autism is a disability of trust

Trusting their body

Trusting the world

Trusting other people.”

 

 “The best way to help them (autistic children) progress toward fulfilling meaningful lives is

Find ways to engage them

Build a sense of self

Foster joyful experiences”

 

In his book, Dr. Prizant outlines  ways to help autistic people . From my family’s experience, we have learned the importance of almost all of them.  I list them here, along with some of my personal observations.

little boy walking with mother, holding hands

participating in our community Walk for Autism event

 

 

 

“Welcome them  into your world”

Include them in family and social activities to whatever extent they can and will participate.

 

little boy with Easter basket full of eggs

Success at an Easter egg hunt.

 

 

 

 

 

“Don’t label them – high-functioning  vs low -functioning”

I was pleased to read that Dr. Prizant’s does not use those terms. As he says,

“People are infinitely complex and development is multidimensional and cannot be reduced to such a simple dichotomy. “

He goes on to call these labels “terribly inaccurate and misleading ” and that using them is “disrespectful.” The label low-functioning can become a self-fulfilling prophesy.

He concludes,

“Instead of focusing on vague and imprecise labels, it’s better to focus on the child’s relative strengths and challenges, and to identify the most beneficial supports. “

 

He discusses this in more detail in this article from 2012.

A False (Harmful?) Dichotomy 

 

“Engage them; try to communicate”

Not all autistic people are verbal; but they all communicate in some way. We just need to understand how and work with that

2016-09-28-18-50-18

exercising with the video game

 

 

 

“Give choices”

“Treat respectfully, with empathy and  sensitivity”

“Meltdowns are a common occurrence with autism but are not “temper tantrums”. They usually reflect a need or want that isn’t being met, or a situation that is overwhelming or too stimulating.  We try to adjust the circumstances to his feelings, not force him into something that is uncomfortable for him.

 

little boy wearing sunglasses

Check out those shades; being silly helps sometimes.

 

 

 

 

“Humor”

Sometimes you just need to laugh.

 

children in Halloween masks

searching for the perfect Halloween mask with his older sister

 

 

 

“Offer to help but no unsolicited advice or criticism”

I ask a lot of  questions. Whenever I meet someone who has an autistic child or relative, a  special education teacher  or therapist of  developmentally challenged persons , I try to learn something from them. Friends occasionally offer  advice about a therapy or some facility that I often already know about. As long as it is offered non-judgmentally I appreciate their interest. So far I’ve never had anyone overtly criticise.

“Be positive; use tenderness with your honesty.”

 

little boy with a big camera

eager to try new things

 

 

 

 

 

“Celebrate with us”

Don’t be afraid to ask how things are going, as long as you don’t mind sometimes hearing the bad as well as the good.

 

girl and boy in a corn field

exploring the corn maze with sister

 

 

 

 

“Trust- be dependable, clear and concrete”

man and boy on the floor

Rough-housing with grandpa

 

 

 

 

 

 

I am happy to say my grandson is doing well. He benefits from speech and occupational therapy, special education in the public school, and the prayers and support from our friends and family, especially his parents and sister.

I  see him and every other person with autism as “Uniquely Human” ; knowing and loving him has changed my life in  ways I could not have imagined and would not want to miss.

Learn What motivated Dr. Prizant to write Uniquely Human

in this interview by autism specialist Becca Lory

THE SPARK- A Mother’s Story of Nurturing, Genius, and Autism

Another book that encouraged me is THE SPARK  by Kristine Barnett. When her son Jake was diagnosed with autism at 2 years old, doctors told her he would never attend school for “normal’ children. Undeterred, she taught him herself, building on his strengths. By 16, he was attending college- and helping to teach classes in quantum physics.

I don’t know if Mrs. Barnett knew of Dr. Prizant’s methods, but it certainly sounds as if she used them. Or maybe she just followed her motherly instincts. Here’s how she says it in the introduction.

“This book is the story of how we got from there to here, the story of a mother’s journey with her remarkable son…it is about the power of hope and the dazzling possibilities that can occur when we keep our minds open and learn how to tap the true potential that lies within every child. “

I highly recommend this book to anyone who needs or wants to know more about autism.

 

 

 

Please share with your friends and join me  for the year’s  most viewed post. 

Follow Watercress Words as we explore the HEART of HEALTH. 

Thanks for being here with me. I appreciate your interest. 

Dr.Aletha