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Meeting Mother Teresa -Tuesday Travels

exploring the heart of health when travelling makes for interesting discoveries #MotherTeresa#PeoriaIllinois

I made a business trip to Peoria Illinois, a place I had never been before.   To pass some time while waiting for my flight ,I drove around the city and  discovered this magnificent church near downtown. I wasn’t expecting to find anything like this.

This is the Cathedral of St. Mary of the Immaculate Conception, built in 1889.  The Peoria Public library tells the story of the church at this link.

statue of Mother Teresa in the church yard
statue of Mother Teresa in the church yard

Baptized on August 27, 1910, in Skopje, Macedonia, Mother Teresa took her final vows as a nun in 1937 , taught in India for 17 years before her 1946 “call within a call” to devote herself to caring for the sick and poor.

Her order established a hospice; centers for the blind, aged, and disabled; and a leper colony.

In 1979 she received the Nobel Peace Prize for her humanitarian work. She died in September 1997 and was beatified in October 2003. In December 2015, Pope Francis recognized a second miracle attributed to Mother Teresa, clearing the way for her to be canonized as a saint in 2016. (source biography.com)

doors to the Cathedral of St Mary

 Mother Teresa visited Peoria Illinois in 1960 to speak before a Catholic women’s group.  She told them,

“I am a poor woman that prays.

God has not called us to be successful, but to be helpful.”

 (photographs by Dr. Aletha)

 

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No Greater Love is the essential wisdom of Mother Teresa — the most accessible, intimate, and inspiring book of her teachings. Thematically arranged to present her revolutionary vision of Christianity in its graceful simplicity, the book features her thoughts on love, generosity, forgiveness, prayer, service, and what it means to be a Christian. A passionate testament to deep hope and abiding faith in God, No Greater Love celebrates the life and work of one of the world’s most revered spiritual teachers.”

(This is an affiliate link  provided for your convenience and to  allow this blog to earn a commission from sales at no extra cost to you. )

 

 

Weekend word-love

What we learn about love from 1 John
#Bible#love

1 John 4:16-21, ESV Bible

16 So we have come to know and to believe the love that God has for us. God is love, and whoever abides in love abides in God, and God abides in him.

17 By this is love perfected with us, so that we may have confidence for the day of judgment, because ashe is so also are we in this world.

18 There is no fear in love, but perfect love casts out fear. For fear has to do with punishment, and whoever fears has not been perfected in love.

19 We love because he first loved us.

20 if anyone says, “I love God,” and hates his brother, he is a liar; for he who does not love his brother whom he has seen cannot 1 loveGod whom he has not seen.

21 And his commandment we have from him: whoever loves God must also love his brother.

Read the English Standard Version at ESV.org

 

God is love - words on a cross plaque

The rash that spreads- what you need to know about measles

Measles and mumps- 2 old diseases that are making a comeback #measles#mumps

You may continue reading here, but there is an updated version at this link

Measles, not gone, not forgotten

The rash of measles, also known as rubeola, starts on the head and spreads to the trunk (chest and upper back) , arms, and legs over a few days .

What is measles?

It used to be one of the “usual childhood diseases” that most of us over age 55 years contracted as children, prior to the use of the vaccine. It is caused by a virus in the Paramyxoviridae family and spread by person to person contact.

The other childhood diseases were

  • Rubella, or  German measles
  • Chicken pox, or  varicella
  • Roseola
  • Fifth Disease, or erythema infectiosum

These all cause a rash, called an exanthem.

Mumps was also a common childhood disease but does not usually cause a rash.

Symptoms of measles include cough, nasal drainage, reddened, inflamed eyes, and a rash as pictured below.

the rash of measles
image courtesy of the CDC- Centers for Disease Control , U.S. government

There is no specific treatment and it runs its course in about 1-2 weeks. Antibiotics are not effective .

Most of those infected recover uneventfully but there can be serious complications including pneumonia and encephalitis (inflammation of the brain).

Preventing measles and other exanthems

After the measles vaccine was introduced in 1963 the number of reported cases was reduced by 99%. In 2000 measles was declared no longer endemic ( occurring routinely) in the United States. Thus public health officials consider an outbreak a major setback in the control of infectious disease.

Measles vaccine is usually administered as a “3 in 1” vaccine- the MMR, which has been vilified as a possible cause of autism, although that has been thoroughly discredited.

The other two letters in the mix stand for mumps and rubella (also known as German measles) both of which are also caused by viruses and for which no treatment exists.

No vaccine exists for roseola or Fifth Disease, but we have an effective vaccine for chickenpox.

You can listen to  2 DOCS TALK  about mumps at this link or read the transcript.

Mumps – The Disease, the Vaccine, the Problem

“But recent increases in those who choose to have their children forego vaccines has led to a loss of herd immunity and an increase in these outbreaks.

To further complicate the issue, it seems that immunity wanes with time, which is why many college students (hello spring break!) find themselves falling ill eight to ten years after their last booster at age 12 to 15.”

My family receives vaccines and believe any potential risk is worth the benefit. I urge you to think carefully and talk to a trusted physician before you decide to forgo vaccination for yourself and especially for your children.

Thanks for visiting this blog and considering this vital information as we explore the HEART of health together.

Dr. Aletha 

Should your family receive vaccinations?

This post is being updated with the current CDC vaccination recommendations. With a few exceptions for medical reasons I believe all adults should discuss vaccination with their physician and be immunized for any diseases for which they are at risk.

Current vaccination recommendations, 2019

This post is being updated with the current CDC vaccination recommendations. With a few exceptions for medical reasons I believe all adults should discuss vaccination with their physician and be immunized for any diseases for which they are at risk.

And I recommend that parents do the same for their children and adolescents.

RECOMMENDED ADULT IMMUNIZATIONS 2019
RECOMMENDED CHILD AND ADOLESCENT IMMUNIZATIONS 2019

Some questions to ask about vaccines and the immunization process include.

  • What contagious diseases is a person likely to be exposed to?
  • What are the risks of those diseases?
  • What are the risks of a particular vaccine for that person?
  • What are the risks versus benefits to other people?
  • What else can we do to prevent an infection?

Infectious disease control methods

The  developed countries  have eliminated or controlled many of the environmental sources of contagious disease by manipulating our environment.

  • indoor plumbing
  • water treatment facilities
  • screens on windows
  • air purification
  • wear gloves to prepare food
  • inspect restaurants
  • signs in many public restrooms reminding us to wash our hands.
Hand hygiene saves lives.
Hygiene remains vital to infection prevention even when immunizations are given.

However, we have not eliminated another source of infectious disease- and that is other humans.

Rarely do we isolate or quarantine people with infections. Most of us have gone to work, school or social events with symptoms suggestive of infection- a cough, runny nose, upset stomach- putting our friends and colleagues at risk.

Please review these excellent resources on vaccine use

A basic review of  Childhood vaccines  and Adult vaccines from UpToDate, a researched, non- commercial medical publication for doctors and patients

The Science Behind Vaccination from The New York Times

 7 things about vaccines from The Washington Post

Reconsidering vaccination a blog post review of the book The Vaccine Friendly Plan

Voices for Vaccines – a parent-led organization that supports and advocates for on-time vaccination and the reduction of vaccine-preventable disease.

Thanks for reading and sharing this important information about protecting the HEART of health.

I appreciate all of you who follow this blog; there are numerous other blogs to choose from so I am honored you chose to spend some time here. A special welcome to all my new followers from this past month.

To start following Watercress Words , use this form to get an email notification of new posts . Please find and follow me on Facebook, Pinterest and LinkedIn, links are on the left side bar here and the Home page. Thanks so much.

Dr.  Aletha