Why Messiah belongs to Easter and doctors once cut hair

Handel’s father, Georg Handel, was a barber-surgeon, a term for physicians in the middle ages who did surgery and cut hair. Surgery was primitive and dangerous due to no anesthesia and no antibiotics to treat infection. Most surgery was done to treat war injuries.

 The King of Glory

Psalm 24:7-10, ERV

 Gates, proudly lift your heads!
Open, ancient doors,
and the glorious King will come in.
Who is the glorious King?
He is the Lord, the powerful soldier.
He is the Lord, the war hero.
 
 
 
 Gates, proudly lift your heads!
Open, ancient doors,
and the glorious King will come in.
Who is the glorious King?
The Lord All-Powerful is the glorious King.
 
 
bright light shining through heavy wood doors
Lightstock.com

 

 

Copyright © 2006 by Bible League international

Handel’s masterpiece-Messiah 

Even though Messiah tells the story of Jesus, whose life unfolds in the Bible’s New Testament, many of the lyrics come from the Old Testament, like this passage today from Psalms. Several Isaiah passages referring to Jesus are also songs in Messiah .

We usually associate  Messiah with Christmas, but Handel wrote it to be performed at Easter. For the lyrics, he used  words  from Scripture, choosing passages that tell the story of God sending Jesus to earth to redeem His people.


Framed Art Print ‘A Barber Surgeon Tending a Peasants Foot’ by Isaack Koedijck

Handel’s father, Georg Handel, was a barber-surgeon, a term for physicians in the middle ages who did surgery and cut hair. Surgery was primitive and dangerous due to no anesthesia and no antibiotics to treat infection. Most surgery was done to treat war injuries. 

 Handel’s Messiah -Listen on Apple Music 

Other posts in this series

Lenten Words – Comfort

Lenten Words-Light

Lenten Words – Rest

Lenten Words – Sorrow

FAITH, HOPE, LOVE in wooden block letters
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I appreciate all of you who follow this blog; there are numerous other blogs to choose from so I am honored you chose to spend some time here. A special welcome to all my new followers from this past month.

(This post contains affiliate links which, by paying a commission if used for a purchase, help fund this blog. )

To start following Watercress Words , use this form to get an email notification of new posts . Please find and follow me on Facebook, Pinterest and LinkedIn, links are on the left side bar here and the Home page. Thanks so much.

                              Dr. Aletha 

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APRIL Timely Topics-spring, special days, travel

I hope you can take advantage of the warmth to be outdoors doing fun and healthy activities-walking, biking, swimming, gardening, playing with kids. I’ll share some posts to help you do those activities safely.

In the northern half of the earth it’s finally spring all month long. Warmer, longer days are pleasant but can bring new health challenges and opportunities.

I hope you can take advantage of the warmth to be outdoors doing fun and healthy activities-walking, biking, swimming, gardening, playing with kids. I’ll share some posts to help you do those activities safely.

Photo by Lgh_9 on Pexels.com

April timely topics include

  • how to avoid sunburn, insect bites, and blisters
  • health issues that occur in the spring and summer, like seasonal allergies
  • events that occur in April or that we remember this month
  • water safety

faith, hope, and love

And in the faith, hope, and love selections we’ll remember Christians’ observance of Easter

April 19-remembering Oklahoma City

On April 19, 1995, a domestic terrorist left a bomb in a truck in front of the federal building in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma; I had lived there for 7 years while in medical school and residency. 168 people died, including 19 children. Until 9/11/2001, it was the largest loss of life due to terrorism on U.S. soil.

The incident was shocking and traumatic to our entire country but especially here in our state. Oklahoma is usually a peaceful place; we deal with tornadoes and floods but not bombings. So every year we remember the victims, their families, and especially those who rescued the wounded , and the survivors who rebuilt their lives.

window at the Oklahoma City bombing museum
Oklahoma City National Memorial and Museum

thanks for exploring with me

I appreciate all of you who follow this blog; there are numerous other blogs to choose from so I am honored you chose to spend some time here. A special welcome to all my new followers from this past month.

To start following Watercress Words , use this form to get an email notification of new posts . Please find and follow me on Facebook, Pinterest and LinkedIn, links are on the left side bar here and the Home page. Thanks so much.

You will find links to the Timely Topics on the Home page and on the right sidebar on every post (you may need to scroll down to find them on a mobile or tablet)

Featured image

The featured image at the top of this post is a beautiful dogwood tree. They bloom in the spring here in Oklahoma.

Here are some affiliate links you may find helpful. Thanks for considering.

                              Dr. Aletha 

Spring Promotion – $5 off $45 @ eBooks.com. Use Code: springebookscp. Valid until June 20.
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Fasting for the body and the soul

Observed by Catholic , Orthodox, and Protestant Christians, (although the dates may differ) Lent is a time of spiritual reflection, contemplation, renewal, and commitment.

The practice of fasting is one of the Christian Disciplines.

people holding lit candles in the dark

What is fasting?

Simply put, fasting means to refrain from  foods and/or drink either partially or completely, for a specified time periods.  Religions other than Christianity also practice some form of fasting.

Traditionally, one  observed Lent( the weeks that precede Easter) by avoiding certain types of food (particularly meat, eggs, and milk products).  In some traditions, partial fasts were observed where participants would eat only one meal on certain days. Another way to fast is to avoid all food for a specified time frame, usually one day.

Many who observe Lent today are not as strict.  Often they choose to abstain from a particular food or particular behavior such as television or social media during Lent.

The purpose of fasting during Lent  is to refrain from something to redirect the time and energy  on our relationship to God.

man praying on holy bible in the morning

Medical fasting

You may be more familiar with fasting for medical reasons.

We physicians frequently ask patients to fast for 8-12 hours prior to performing certain blood tests. The meaning of the result may be different depending on how long ago the patient had eaten. This is the case when we test for diabetes (sugar or glucose) and hyperlipidemia ( cholesterol and triglyceride).

Another common time for medical fasting is prior to surgery or procedures, especially those done under general anesthesia. Many people become nauseated at this time and may throw up or regurgitate stomach contents. If these get sucked down into the lungs it can cause respiratory distress and lead to pneumonia, both serious complications of surgery. Having the stomach empty of food and liquid can minimize this risk .

There is evidence now that intermittent fasting may aid in weight loss. Dr. Monique Tello discusses intermittent fasting for the Harvard Health Blog at this link.

Intermittent fasting: Surprising update

ashes in the shape of a cross

40 days of sorrow

The 40 days of Lent are also a time of grief.

This tradition begins with the first day of Lent, Ash Wednesday. Ashes are put on believers’ foreheads during religious services as a sign of repentance.

The practice of putting ashes on one’s head is an ancient sign of mourning that was often done at funerals or similarly sorrowful occasions.  In this case, the ashes represent sorrow over our sins and the pain and death caused by sin.

two women sitting on a rug with open books

Whether you formally observe Lent or not, we may consider this as a time to slow down, quiet the noise in our lives, open our hearts, and listen for new inspiration for using our gifts to create new ways to serve others.

“For even the Son of Man  (Jesus ) came not to be served but to serve others and to give his life as a ransom for many.”

Mark 10:45 NLT

New Living Translation (NLT)Holy Bible, New Living Translation, copyright © 1996, 2004, 2007, 2013, 2015 by Tyndale House Foundation. Used by permission of Tyndale House Publishers Inc., Carol Stream, Illinois 60188. All rights reserved.

40 Days of Decrease

Last year I experienced Lent with this devotional book by Alicia Britt Chole and I recommend it to help you observe a spiritually meaningful “fast” during Lent.

(Please note this is an affiliate link, a link which will help support this blog with a commission when a purchase is made.)


Every day offers a meaningful consideration of Jesus’ journey and then invites readers into a daily fast of heart-clutter, the stuff that sticks to our souls and weighs us down. 

Amazon

Thanks for exploring the HEART of health with me.

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I appreciate all of you who follow this blog; there are numerous other blogs to choose from so I am honored you chose to spend some time here. A special welcome to all my new followers from this past month.

To start following Watercress Words , use this form to get an email notification of new posts . Please find and follow me on Facebook, Pinterest and LinkedIn. Thanks so much.

sharing faith, hope, and love with you

                              Dr. Aletha 

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March Timely Topics-doctors, spring, and sleep

March comes “in like a lion and goes out like a lamb” -at least where I live. But March also concludes with Doctors’ Day on March 30, a day to recognize physicians and their service to our health needs.

March comes “in like a lion and goes out like a lamb” -at least where I live. But March also concludes with Doctors’ Day on March 30, a day to recognize physicians and their service to our health needs.

Rather than waiting til the end, I will share stories by and about physicians all month long here and on social media.

March timely topics include

  • winter health concerns
  • spring health issues
  • sleep changes due to Daylight Saving Time change

faith, hope, and love

And in the faith, hope, and love selections we’ll remember St. Patrick and meditate on devotions for Lent.

Good-by Google+

Sometime in April the Google+platform will end. Thanks to all of you who followed and shared my posts there. Please continue following me here and on other social media.

I am most active on Facebook and Pinterest, but you can also find my blog posts at Twitter and LinkedIn.

with my thanks

I appreciate all of you who follow this blog; there are numerous other blogs to choose from so I am honored you chose to spend some time here. A special welcome to all my new followers from this past month.

To start following Watercress Words , use this form to get an email notification of new posts . Please find and follow me on Facebook, Pinterest and LinkedIn, links are on the left side bar here and the Home page. Thanks so much.

You will find links to the Timely Topics on the Home page and on the right sidebar on every post (you may need to scroll down to find them on a mobile or tablet)

Here are some affiliate links you may find helpful. Thanks for considering.

                              Dr. Aletha 

Free Babsy Board Books! Spring Promotion – $5 off $45 @ eBooks.com. Use Code: springebookscp. Valid until June 20.

5 unexpected rewards by ditching a critical spirit

Life lessons from the late Catherine Marshall to start the Lenten season #judgenot#Lent#fasting

Did you notice that Valentine’s Day and Ash Wednesday fell on the same date this year? What a coincidence that a day when people often give or receive chocolate was also a day that some people choose to give up chocolate for 40 days.

What happens during Lent

Lent is the season in the Christian calendar that precedes Easter. (Easter also falls on an interesting date this year, April 1. ) Many Christians do something to observe this time as a spiritual refresher, like fasting from a certain food or drink. I’ve heard of people “giving up” a range of things during Lent, like television, video games, social media, news, sports, or music. Some people “take up” a certain practice, like prayer, Bible study, or service projects.

man with hands folded over a book
“meditation of my heart” photo from Lightstock.com– stock photo source (affiliate link)

A “critical” lesson

One of most interesting examples of fasting I’ve heard of was from the late Catherine Marshall. Mrs. Marshall wrote a memoir about her husband, Peter Marshall who served as Chaplain of the United States Senate. She also wrote a best selling novel Christy.

 

 

In a story reprinted in Spiritual Classics, Catherine realized she was too critical, tending to judge people and situations harshly and negatively.

Matthew 7 :1-2 New Living Translation (NLT)

Do not judge others, and you will not be judged. For you will be treated as you treat others.The standard you use in judging is the standard by which you will be judged. 

Holy Bible, New Living Translation, copyright © 1996, 2004, 2007, 2013, 2015 by Tyndale House Foundation. Used by permission of Tyndale House Publishers Inc., Carol Stream, Illinois 60188. All rights reserved.

(The word “judge” used here is analogous to “criticise.”)

 

So she felt her “assignment” from God was:

“For one day I was to go on a “fast” from criticism. I was not to criticize anybody about anything.”

 

At lunch with her family that day several topics came up that she had definite negative opinions about but she refrained from speaking up. Even though she felt lost without her usual sharp interaction, she said no one else seemed to notice.

“The federal government, the judicial system, the the institutional church could apparently get along fine without my penetrating observations.”

She thought about a young man she knew whose life had gotten “sidetracked”, and suddenly realized her negative attitude toward him wasn’t helping. As she began thinking about him in a more positive way, she saw ways that his life could be turned around that she had not considered before. Her new attitude seemed to create an ability to see a new vision for his life that she hadn’t been able to before.

5 unexpected rewards by ditching a critical spirit

She related 5 things that she learned about a critical attitude.

  1. It focuses us on ourselves and makes us unhappy.
  2. It can distort our perspective and destroy humor.
  3. It blocks positive creative thoughts God will give us about situations.
  4. It impairs relationships with other people, perhaps causing them to be critical also.
  5. It blocks feelings of  love, good will, and mercy from  God’s Spirit.

 

 

Whatever you decide to do to observe Lent, look for something that will restore or increase your joy, creativity, positive relationships, mercy, and love.

I would love to know what you do to observe Lent. Please leave a comment, or if you prefer to stay anonymous, send me a private message.

This passage from Matthew is from the Sermon on the Mount. Other posts from the Sermon include these links-

Opportunities to do good

The surprising blessing of discomfort

How to be blessed, happy, and healthy

How to satisfy hunger and thirst

 

 

The story about Catherine Marshal is told in Spiritual Classics- Selected Readings on the Twelve Spiritual Disciplines.

Books by Catherine Marshall – find more at this link

These are all affiliate links, this blog earns a small commission for purchases here.

that I might seek to love-St. Francis quote

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This post was shared at

Woman to Woman Ministries

 

 

I hope you enjoyed these words of faith, hope, and love and will join me again. Thank you so much.

           Dr. Aletha 

Celebrating good news

If you have ever attended a live performance of Messiah, you probably stood up during the  Hallelujah Chorus.  That tradition dates back to King George II of England who according to tradition, was so moved during this song that he stood to his feet. Since he was the king, everyone  had to stand with him.

Revelation 19,  King James Version

And I heard as it were the voice of a great multitude, and as the voice of many waters, and as the voice of mighty thunderings, saying,

Alleluia: for the Lord God omnipotent reigneth.

And the seventh angel sounded; and there were great voices in heaven, saying,

The kingdoms of this world are become the kingdoms of our Lord, and of his Christ; and he shall reign for ever and ever.

And he hath on his vesture and on his thigh a name written,

King Of Kings, And Lord Of Lords.

The birth of Jesus made possible not just a new way of understanding life but a new way of living it.
Carl Frederick Buechner is an American writer and theologian. (affiliate link) graphic credit Lightstock.com (affiliate link)

 

 

Messiah Hallelujah Chorus

Often referred to as the Hallelujah Chorus, this passage is the most recognized part of Handel’s Messiah. We associate  Messiah with Christmas, but Handel wrote it to be performed at Easter. He drew the words of the songs from Scripture, choosing passages that tell the story of God sending Jesus to earth to redeem His people.
If you have ever attended a live performance of Messiah, you probably stood up during the  Hallelujah Chorus.  That tradition dates back to King George II of England who according to tradition, was so moved during this song that he stood to his feet. Since he was the king, everyone  had to stand with him.

 

Learn more about

The Pure Power Of Handel’s ‘Hallelujah Chorus’

 

 

 

Thank you for sharing these Advent reflections with me during this special season of  faith, hope, and love. Dr. Aletha 

"faith, hope, love"

Shouting good news                                   Announcing good news 

Bringing good news 

 

 

 

Lenten Words – Alleluia

The origin of Handel’s Hallelujah chorus
#Easter#Handel#Messiah

Revelation, King James Version

19;6 And I heard as it were the voice of a great multitude, and as the voice of many waters, and as the voice of mighty thunderings, saying,

Alleluia: for the Lord God omnipotent reigneth.

11;15 And the seventh angel sounded; and there were great voices in heaven, saying,

The kingdoms of this world are become the kingdoms of our Lord, and of his Christ; and he shall reign for ever and ever.

lightstock_411530_jpg_aletha

graphic by Lightstock.com

 

 

19:16 And he hath on his vesture and on his thigh a name written,

King Of Kings, And Lord Of Lords.

 

Often referred to as the Hallelujah Chorus, this passage is the most recognized part of Handel’s Messiah. If you have ever attended a live performance of Messiah, you probably stood during the singing of the Hallelujah Chorus.  That tradition dates back to King George II of England, who according to tradition ,was so moved during this song that he stood to his feet. Since he was the king, everyone else had to stand also.

 

Messiah-complete works

 

We usually associate  Messiah with Christmas, but Handel wrote it to be performed at Easter. He drew the words of the songs from Scripture, choosing passages that tell the story of God sending Jesus to earth to redeem His people.

 

 

 

 

Lenten Words-Light

Lenten Words – Comfort

Lenten Words-Rest

Lenten Words – Glory

 

Thanks for joining me in this Lenten observance.

Next week I start a series of Weekend Words about wisdom from Proverbs in the Bible.

Please share this blog with your friends.