10 health blogs you should read- blogs by docs

Since I started blogging I have reviewed many health, fitness and wellness blogs. I find most of them interesting and/or entertaining. I find a few of them informative, stimulating and valuable.

I have read health bloggers who write about their personal experience dealing with a particular medical condition, which I think can be powerful and helpful.

Some bloggers write to discuss and promote a particular lifestyle or product that they believe has value to health and/or fitness.

And there are blogs written by people with training and experience in some aspect of medical care, wellness, fitness and/or nutrition (all of which I define broadly)

I think all of these blogs have a place and all seem to have their audience. One of the first things I check when I read a blog is the “about” section, or its equivalent. I want to know who writes the blog and what their credentials are. Anyone who writes a blog about a particular topic should clearly and accurately state their credentials for that topic, or lack of, if that’s the case. (I state my credentials on the page “Meet Dr. Aletha”)

If I wrote a cooking blog, I would admit that I have no training in cooking, other than high school home economics (do they still teach that in school?), which was a long time ago.  I would explain that I created or borrowed the  recipes,  report how I prepared it and how it tasted. I would make no claims as to its likely success for you  and tell you to try it at your own risk.

I wish all health bloggers would do the same. Most do, and for that I commend them.

I believe all bloggers who promote and/or recommend products or procedures to prevent or treat medical issues should confirm whether or not they have accredited education in that discipline.

In this blog series, I will tell you about health blogs that are worth reading. Most of them are written by physicians, medical scientists, other health professionals and affiliated professionals. Persons who spend the majority, if not all, of their adult life studying and pursuing a discipline, likely know that subject well.

Many writers research and report about medical information. By virtue of their education, training, and experience, physicians know how to interpret and apply that information.

I recommend these health blogs because they

  • offer valid medical information on a variety of topics.
  • offer sound advice without quick fixes.
  • discuss common everyday health concerns
  • discuss the healthcare system, how it works well and how it doesn’t.
  • offer insights on healthy living, both as individuals, families and a society.
  • show you how physicians think , feel and act , both as persons and professionals
  • will educate and challenge you.

 

These blogs open a window into the medical community.  You may be surprised that physicians have the same concerns about health and medical care as you , and some that you are unaware of. Most importantly, you will find they are on your side; they care about you,their patients,  probably a lot more than you care about them.

Physicians bloggers work long hours in their demanding practices and also have “lives”, meaning spouses, children, friends, homes and hobbies; they still make time to write blog posts, often without compensation and without charging you. I think you should take advantage of their expertise.

These are blogs written by a single or several physicians. I am not including blogs which accompany medical websites affiliated with universities, medical centers, professional associations or government agencies. Perhaps later I will give you a list of my favorites among those. As I discover other valuable blogs, I will share those with you also.

These bloggers’ viewpoints often surprise and challenge me; I don’t always agree with them and you may not either.  By recommending them, I don’t endorse their opinions, nor do I benefit financially.  

We’ll explore these 10 over several days so check back often, or subscribe by email to make it easy to keep up.

The accompanying photos are illustrative only, and are not necessarily affiliated with the blogs or bloggers mentioned.

 

 

“Alert and Oriented”

the progress notes of Michel Accad, M.D.

(Doctors write progress notes  in the charts of hospitalized patients to document medical treatment and response each day)

Dr. Accad is a cardiologist and internist in solo private practice and teaches at the University of California San Francisco.

” ‘Alert and Oriented’ is a medical phrase that describes the mental status of a patient who, despite being in serious shock from trauma or disease, maintains clarity of mind and focus of thought.

 

EKG tracing of heart activity on a cardiac monitor.
Based on the heart rhythm, this patient is likely alert and oriented.

 

Sadly, the medical community enmeshed in today’s health care system is like a patient in acute shock. The only chance to survive is to remain alert and oriented.” (quote from the blog introduction)

Dr. Accad blogs about the healthcare system, the doctor-patient relationship, medical ethics, medical economics, and health care policy.

In this older post he explains the

evolution of the food pyramid to the healthy plate nutrition recommendation.

healthy plate of vegetables , pita bread and hummus

 

In another interesting post, he explains

why mammograms may be over diagnosing breast cancer.

 

 

 

 

I have previously introduced you to Kristin Prentiss Ott, M.D. when I shared her post about emergency room care here. Dr. Ott is an emergency physician who writes

Emergency helicopter landing at a hospital.
Some of Dr. Ott’s patients arrive this way.

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Rx Blog Therapy

“because writing and relating are good medicine”.

In addition to medicine she writes about parenting, politics, faith and reading/writing.

Here she offers some soul searching thoughts on sexism and racism.

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