October Timely Topic- INFLUENZA

This post is not very “timely” as October is halfway through. My husband and I have been dealing with some health challenges of our own as well as getting ready for a wedding. However, the topic is no less timely.

(This post has affiliate links; I hope they help you find information and inspiration and help me fund this blog by the commission they will generate. )

a woman taking her temperature
This photograph depicted a woman who was using a modern, battery-powered oral thermometer, in order to measure her body temperature. In order to return an accurate reading, this particular type of thermometer needed to be placed beneath the user’s tongue, for a set amount of time, beeping when the ambient, sublingual temperature was reached. Photo credit-James Gathany, CDC, public domain

Influenza

In this part of the world the influenza season is starting, even though influenza can occur year round. Once again, the majority of physicians and other health professionals recommend vaccination as the most effective way to lower one’s risk of getting influenza. No matter how many people would like to believe otherwise, for most people the risk of influenza is greater than the risk of the influenza vaccine.

I recommend you read Dr. Gretchen LaSalle‘s thorough review

FLU VACCINE 101

Managing influenza and other winter illness

Most of the winter respiratory illnesses are not influenza, but can still make us feel miserable. Most of the time most of us recover uneventfully, but these diseases can cause more severe disease in certain people, like infants, elderly, and those with compromised immune systems. Here are some previous posts with info you need to know about keeping you and your family well and safe.

6 tips to cope during a flu epidemic

a man taking his temperature
Photo credit Lauren Bishop-CDC/ National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID)

How you can cope with winter illness

6 smart facts about antibiotic use
graphic created by the Centers for Disease Control, http://www.cdc.gov

And here is how to know when to seek emergency medical help.

When should you call 911?

Hand hygiene saves lives. a sign reading "please wash your hands"
One of the most effective ways to prevent and stop the spread of infectious disease.

sharing the HEART of health

I appreciate all of you who follow this blog; there are numerous other blogs to choose from so I am honored you chose to spend some time here. A special welcome to all my new followers from this past month.

To start following Watercress Words , use this form to get an email notification of new posts . Please find and follow me on Facebook, Pinterest and LinkedIn. Thanks so much.

Dear friends, I hope all is well with you and that you are as healthy in body as you are strong in spirit. 

3 John 2

Stay well this winter, or what ever season you are enjoying now.

                              Dr. Aletha 

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My Reader Rewards Club is a great way to earn free books and Bibles for yourself, friends, and family! Your journey to earning free faith-based products starts HERE.
(When you sign up through these links, I can earn free books too.)

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Get active

Becoming and staying fit may also help you fight off infection. I’ve been using this fitness app on my phone, Aaptiv. Consider trying it. I’d appreciate you using this affiliate link through which you can help fund this blog. Thanks and enjoy.

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What women doctors want you to know about healthcare

September is Women in Medicine Month, so in this post I’m introducing you to some women physicians who promote health in creative ways-writing, speaking, coaching, and advocating.

At Dr. Momma Says, Dr. Deborah Burton, pediatric ENT surgeon reviews her reasons for recommending vaccination.

“The growing antivaccination (anti-vax) movement has me confused.  I think it is a developed world thing to celebrate where we are, but we forget where we came from.

As an ENT surgeon who has studied and worked in the healthcare field for about 30 years, I have borne witness to the miracles that vaccines have done. There is no question in my mind that vaccines work.” She goes on to describe

MY AUTHENTIC 30 YEAR JOURNEY REVEALING SPECTACULAR WAYS THAT VACCINES WORK

Recommended Child and Adolescent Immunization Schedule
2019 Recommended Vaccinations for children and adolescents

Psychiatrist Dr. Melissa Welby writes

“Anxiety is a treatable condition. Depending on the intensity, some people can get better on their own and others need therapy and/or medications to help with anxiety. Either way, recovering from anxiety is possible! There are great self-help options available to assist with the treatment of anxiety which includes websites, apps, and books on overcoming anxiety.” Find her list at this post-

48 Resources to Overcome Anxiety for Adults and Children

From Charmaine Gregory, M.D., an ER doctor and fitness coach blogs at Fervently Fit with Charmaine with nutrition and fitness tips.

“Trips to the grocery store are almost as crucial as trips to work. We all need to eat. Some people have stress when they try and go in without a plan. Creating a routine is a good step. Following a few helpful hints can make your shopping easier on you.” Read her tips at

Quick Tips for Easier Grocery Shopping

a basket filled with fruits and vegetables
Will you commit to buying, preparing, and eating more fruits and vegetables? image from LIGHTSTOCK.COM, stock photo site, an affiliate

Dr. Aletha Maybank , a pediatrician, served as deputy commissioner for the New York City health department and now is the first chief health equity officer for the American Medical Association. She believes

Good Health Goes Beyond Having a Doctor and Insurance

“Health is created outside of the walls of the doctor’s office and at the hospital. What are patients’ jobs and employment like? The kind of education they have. Income. Their ability to build wealth. All of these are conditions that impact health. “

(And I’m thrilled that Dr. Maybank and I share our first name.)

The Frugal Physician, Dr. D. writes about finances, specifically how to live debt free. Her main audience is other physicians but she offers advice to patients too.

“Take note of the deductible for your plan and whether your employer chips in. High deductible plans can be alluring because of their low cost and the option to enroll in a Health Savings Account (HSA).  But, if you sign up for one of those, make sure you have the cash to spend the deductible during the year. ” Read the other 9 tips at this link-

10 Ways to Maximize your Doctor’s Visit

a woman in white coat with mask over mouth
Know your health history and medications.

Dr. Eileen Sprys is a family physician who wants you to know

When you have a cold, why I’m not giving you an antibiotic

“I want you to know that as a physician, I feel a pang of insecurity, guilt, and sadness when a patient tells me they’re upset because I won’t write an antibiotic.  I don’t want you to be sick or miserable.

I understand how inconvenient and sometimes life altering a cold can be. I desperately, desperately wish that I had a cure for your cold, but none of us do.

I also want you to know that for every antibiotic I over-prescribe, that I run the unnecessary risk of making someone even more sick, even to the point of hospitalization or death. I went into medicine to help you and to relieve your suffering with integrity — and that by giving you antibiotics without indication, I am betraying my own purpose.”

six-facts-graphic

Emergency medicine physician K. Kay Moody, M.D. wants you to know she is not a “provider” (and neither am I).

“Hi, my name is Dr Moody and I’m NOT a “provider.”

.

Here’s why your doctor isn’t your “provider”.

“The term “provider” levels distinctions and implies a uniformity of expertise and knowledge among health care professionals. The term diminishes those distinctions worthy of differentiation such as education, scope and range of ability.

Generic terminology implies an interchangeability of skills that is inappropriate and erroneous, as well as conferring legitimacy on the provision of health services by non-physician providers that are best performed by, or under the supervision of, physicians.”

position of the American Academy of Family Physicians

a nametag reading ALETHA OGLESBY, M.D.

Women physicians are sharing the HEART of health

I appreciate my female colleagues who share their knowledge and experience through writing in addition to caring for patients. I am honored to share their insights here.

I appreciate all of you who follow this blog; there are numerous other blogs to choose from so I am honored you chose to spend some time here. A special welcome to all my new followers from this past month.

To start following Watercress Words , use this form to get an email notification of new posts . Please find and follow me on Facebook, Pinterest and LinkedIn. Thanks so much.

Dr. Aletha 

Can medical knowledge make you a better patient? Take this quiz.

Parents and educators in my state have been debating the merits of standardized testing for school children and maybe where you live also. And it’s not just a question for children, adults can be subjected to professional testing also.

After I finished my family medicine residency, I took an 8 hour paper multiple choice written exam to become certified by the American Board of Family Medicine (ABFM). And every 10 years since I have taken the test to re-certify. (Originally it was every 7 years).

The purpose of board certification is to make sure you, the patient, are getting the best care possible from a physician. According to the ABFM,

We promise that board certification means that the family physician you choose for your care meets high standards. 

My certification expires at the end of 2019.

Eventually the Board transitioned to a computer based exam taken at a local testing center, still 8 hours long. This year they are trying something new- doctors can take the test on their own computer or tablet whenever and wherever they choose.

The new system is a trial and voluntary. Those of us who have chosen to do it give feedback on the process, what we like and don’t like about it. They hope this will prove to be a workable system that eventually everyone will do.

Here is another experience and opinion about the exam from Clif Knight, M.D. , who is the AAFP’s senior vice president for education.

Certification Pilot Proves Worthy Alternative

a male doctor using a tablet while working
Doctors can answer questions on a computer or tablet any time of day or night.

This exam consists of 25 questions posted quarterly over 3 years, with a 5 minute time limit for each question . Besides being able to take the exam in my pajamas, I can research the answers online if I need to-as long as I can do it in 5 minutes. The rules prohibit me from discussing the questions with another person, based on an honor system that I attest to before beginning each session. Being able to look up information is more like actual medical practice.

More aligned with adult learning principles, this approach allows for use of references and promotes greater retention of new knowledge to be applied in daily practice.

ABFM web site

You can learn more about the value of board certification at this link

American Board of Family Medicine Patient Page

While board certification is a voluntary process, many organizations prefer or require the physicians they hire or work with to be board certified.

Take an “exam” designed for patients

I thought I would give you a taste of what I am doing by creating a patient certification exam for you. The rules prohibit me from sharing actual test questions so I have written my own, in simple medical terms, but using a format similar to the questions I answer.

When I answer questions, I get immediate feedback if my answer was right or wrong, with an explanation and a reference. So I have done the same for you. In this case, the reference is from a blog post I have written.

There’s no time limit for each question and for this exam, feel free to discuss your answers with someone else, I encourage you to. Choose the single best answer. Check at the end for the correct answers.

I had fun writing these questions so I hope you have fun answering them. Good luck! I hope you pass.

Question 1

A woman came to her doctor with a skin rash soon after starting to take a new medication. The medication is most likely

  1. An Antidepressant
  2. A blood pressure lowering drug
  3. An anti-inflammatory drug
  4. An antibiotic

Question 2

A 25 year old woman notices that the skin on her face has darkened over the past several months. This condition is called

  1. Melasma
  2. Eczema
  3. Psoriasis
  4. Tinea

How common meds hurt skin

Skin: Epidermis and Dermis illustration
Line drawing showing cross-section of dermal and epidermal skin layers. National Cancer Institute Creator: Unknown Illustrator This image is in the public domain and can be freely reused. Please credit the source and, where possible, the creator listed above.

Question 3

A mother brings her 8 year old daughter to her family doctor. The child has a cough, runny nose, and mild sore throat. Her temperature is 100.2 degrees. The doctor diagnosed the illness as a cold, or upper respiratory infection and explains this is caused by a virus. She does not prescribe an antibiotic because

  1. The child is allergic to penicillin
  2. The family does not have health insurance
  3. The mother has left over antibiotic from another child at home.
  4. An antibiotic will not help an infection caused by a virus.

How to cope with winter illness

Question 4

A 30 year old woman comes to her doctor because she is losing an excessive amount of hair. She is afraid she will become bald. Most likely she

  1. Started using a cheap shampoo
  2. Delivered a baby
  3. Needs vitamins
  4. Should investigate hair implants

Effective solutions if you experience hair loss

Question 5

Dr. Oglesby believes that certain medications should be used more often because of their benefit to patients. These drugs include all except

  1. Antibiotics
  2. Vitamins
  3. Sleeping pills
  4. Stop smoking drugs

7 underused drugs

Question 6

A young man who is a computer programmer has difficulty falling asleep. His doctor may recommend

  1. Buy a new mattress
  2. Taking a sleeping pill an hour before bedtime
  3. Regular exercise and relaxation techniques
  4. Watching television until he falls asleep

Expert advice to sleep

a simple bed, window shade down, small lamp on a side table

Question 7

Author and motivational speaker Nick Vijucic was born with amelia. This term means he lacks certain parts of his body which are his

  1. Limbs
  2. Eyes
  3. Ears
  4. Teeth

Light and life without limbs

Question 8

A woman sees her doctor because she researched her symptoms online and believes she has endometriosis. She thinks this because

  1. She does not have regular periods.
  2. She had a miscarriage.
  3. She has not been able to get pregnant.
  4. Her sister has it.

Women’s health update

Question 9

The HPV (human papilloma virus) causes cancer. Vaccination against this virus decreases the risk of cancer of the

  1. Cervix
  2. Uterus
  3. Breast
  4. Ovary

Women’s health update

Question 10

Kristin Chenoweth, Tony Award winning actress and singer, suffers from Meniere’s syndrome. She was born in a small town in Oklahoma named

  1. Muskogee
  2. Broken Arrow
  3. Ada
  4. McAlester

Kristin Chenoweth– a review of her memoir

a letter jacket, bag, and shoes, belonging to Kristen Chenoweth
Kristin’s jacket from high school on display at the Performing Arts Center

ANSWERS TO QUESTIONS

  1. The most common drug that causes a skin rash is an antibiotic.
  2. Melasma
  3. Antibiotics do not help a cold or any other viral infection
  4. delivered a baby; hair loss is common after pregnancy
  5. Stop smoking drugs can be useful to help smokers quit. The other drugs listed are often overused.
  6. Exercise and relaxation can improve one’s sleep.
  7. Nick was born without limbs.
  8. Infertility is a common symptom of endometriosis.
  9. Cancer of the cervix is caused by the HPV virus.
  10. Broken Arrow. The other Oklahoma towns produced Carrie Underwood, Blake Shelton, and Reba McIntyre.

testing the HEART of health

Thanks for testing your knowledge with this first ever Watercress Words Certification Exam. If you liked it, let me know, maybe we’ll do it again.

I appreciate all of you who follow this blog; there are numerous other blogs to choose from so I am honored you chose to spend some time here. A special welcome to all my new followers from this past month.

To start following Watercress Words , use this form to get an email notification of new posts . Please find and follow me on Facebook, Pinterest and LinkedIn, links are on the left side bar here and the Home page. Thanks so much.

                              Dr. Aletha 

(This post contains affiliate links which, by paying a commission if used for a purchase, help fund this blog. )

RoboForm Password Manager. What I use to manage passwords.

Go to this link to try RoboForm Free; if you like it you can upgrade to RoboForm Everywhere version with all the features I mentioned above. With Roboform, you will have one less thing to feel stressed about.

How common meds can hurt your skin

In a previous post I told you how smoking and sunlight affect our skin- premature aging, dryness, and increased risk of skin cancer. Here is a link for you to review or read if you missed it.

How smoking and sun affect your skin’s look and feel

Layers of the Skin diagram

Here is a review of the skin’s layers

Medications and skin -help and harm

In this post I’ll talk about ways medications can adversely affect skin health.

Medications, both prescription and over the counter, can relieve symptoms, hasten healing, and save lives. Even so, adverse reactions are always a risk with any drug. Some of these adverse reactions can involve the skin.

So it is vital that patients and doctors avoid unnecessary or inappropriate use of medications.

Sun sensitivity due to medication

As mentioned in the previous post , some medications can make your skin more sensitive to sun exposure, called drug-induced photosensitivity.

Any drug can cause a reaction, even if you have taken it before without a problem. Some of the more common “skin reaction drugs” include

  • Anti-inflammatory medications, the NSAIDs
  • Psychiatric medications
  • Chemotherapy drugs
  • Blood pressure lowering meds
  • Antibiotics
  • Statins-cholesterol lowering drugs

Reactions can vary from scaly rashes, blisters, redness, dryness, itching, to severe eruptions all over the body that can be painful and occasionally life threatening.

This is what your skin looks like under a powerful microscope.

Melasma-drug induced skin color change

Melasma (muh-LAZ-muh) is a common skin problem. It causes brown to gray-brown patches, usually on the face. It is much more common in women, probably because it is triggered by female hormones, so it often starts in pregnancy. Women of color are also more susceptible.

Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

Melasma can be caused by

  • Sun exposure
  • Hormone medications-birth control pills, post -menopause hormonal therapy

Here is an excellent discussion and photos of melasma from the American Academy of Dermatology

Use antibiotics wisely for your skin’s sake

Probably the most common drugs that cause a rash or other adverse effects are antibiotics, probably because they are used so often. A

Antibiotics such as penicillin, amoxicillin, sulfa, tetracycline, and ciprofloxacin can cause several skin reactions .

  • urticaria, also known as hives
  • photosensitivity, mentioned above
  • a scaley rash that may peel off
  • a measles-like rash, called morbiliform
  • blisters

So doctors prescribe antibiotics only for infections that are serious enough that the risk of adverse reaction is worth the possible benefit.

Colds,  flu, and bronchitis are caused by viruses and don’t respond to antibiotics. Even sinus and ear infections don’t always need an antibiotic to resolve. Please don’t pressure your doctor for an antibiotic when you don’t need it. Read more about antibiotic misuse at my previous post

How to navigate the antibiotic highway

6 smart facts about antibiotic use
graphic created by the Centers for Disease Control, http://www.cdc.gov

The American Academy of Dermatology shares

10 skin care secrets for healthier skin

What you should and shouldn’t do now

Please understand I am not saying we should never use these medications as sometimes they are the best choice for our overall health. You should be aware of the potential for reactions and report them promptly to your doctor if they occur.

If you are taking any of the drugs listed here, do not stop without talking to your doctor.

Coming soon-more skin care tips

In a future post I’ll look at common skin injuries and how to help injured skin heal.

Thanks for joining me to explore skin problems and the HEART of health. Even if it’s winter where you live, don’t forgo sunscreen; the sun doesn’t take a holiday from damaging skin.

Please share this post and follow Watercress Words where we explore and share the HEART of health.

                              Dr. Aletha 

a cute monkey checks out his face in a mirrow
We all care about our appearance, including this cute monkey. Photo by Andre Mouton on Pexels.com