What more doctor bloggers are writing about COVID-19

Perhaps one of the greatest lessons we are learning from this pandemic is our need for social connection and community. Perhaps we can ask ourselves, what does it mean to build real community in care communities?

I’ve been reading what some other physician bloggers are writing about the COVID-19 pandemic. Here I share some of them with you. While I believe they are all reliable and honest sources of information, my sharing does not imply endorsement,complete agreement, or advice. This is a topic in which information changes daily if not more often, so all information is subject to change. Always consult the CDC and your state and local health departments for the most recent information that pertains to you.

What to do if you think you have COVID-19

Dr. Linda, a family doctor, explains what to do and what not to do if you think you have caught the coronavirus.

Don’t Panic. The majority of patients will get better without any treatment. I’ve seen many patients, even among those with no symptoms, with very high levels of anxiety. When we turn on the TV these days, it’s all about COVID-19. Remember that the news always shows the worst case scenarios. If watching it makes you more fearful, switch it off. You still need to get updates but limit your exposure to all the negativity aimed at you. Maybe, just check your state’s department of health sites to know what you need to be aware of.

Don’t Go to the ER Because You Think You Have COVID-19/

EMERGENCY-sign
Photo by Pixabay
A COVID-19 Overview

Dr. Andrew Weil, well known as an integrative medicine proponent, wrote this overview of what we know about the coronavirus. He also offers his recommendations for vitamins and supplements that might be safe to take during the pandemic (although not known to prevent or treat the infection) and what substances you should avoid. I reviewed one of Dr. Weil’s books at this link.

Dr. Weil considers the following natural immune stimulating and antiviral agents as likely safe to take before and during a COVID-19 virus infection. However, we don’t know for sure whether any of them will affect the symptoms or severity of the infection.

COVID-19: What You Should Know About Coronavirus

illustration showing the coronavirus which causes COVID-19
Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

Changing our view of nursing homes

Sonja Barsness is not a physician but she wrote a guest post for Dr. Bill Thomas’ blog, Changing Aging.

Perhaps one of the greatest lessons we are learning from this pandemic is our need for social connection and community. Perhaps we can ask ourselves, what does it mean to build real community in care communities?

Covid and Culture Change

If you are depressed and thinking about or planning suicide, please stop and call this number now-1-800-273-8255

cover photo

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) activated its Emergency Operations Center (EOC) to coordinate with the World Health Organization (WHO), federal, state and local public health partners, and clinicians in response to the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) outbreak. CDC is closely monitoring the situation and working 24/7 to provide updates.

credit: CDC/James Gathany-public domain

exploring the HEART of health in a pandemic

I shared other COVID-19 blogs in another post . I hope you check out other posts from these physician bloggers.

Thanks for following this blog. If you’re visiting, I would love for you to start following Watercress Words : use the form to get an email notification of new posts. Don’t worry, you won’t get anything else from me. I also want you to find and follow me on Facebook, Pinterest , Instagram, and LinkedIn .

                              Dr. Aletha 

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Being Mortal- a book review

Some treatments, rather than extending life just prolong the suffering. Still it is heart wrenching for patients and families, along with their doctors, to decide that it is time to forgo treatment and instead opt for palliative care, with or without hospice.

Being Mortal 

Medicine and What Matters in the End

by Atul Gawande, M.D. 

(This blog post features affiliate links which pays a small commission to this blog from purchases, without additional cost to you)

Dr. Atul Gawande is a surgeon at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston, Massachusetts and professor at Harvard Medical School. He writes for The New Yorker and has authored three other bestselling books.

He also (in June 2018) was named  CEO of the Amazon-Berkshire-JPMorgan Chase healthcare partnership, causing some to call him the “most feared CEO in healthcare.”

In Being Mortal, he explores the way most people now live, age and die and for the most part it’s not a pleasant prospect.

Caring for elderly people

As people age and lose independence due to frailness, illness, mental decline and poverty, they often also lose whatever is most important to them- their home, pets, hobbies, possessions. And these losses often occur to protect them from harm as they progress into assisted living centers, nursing homes and hospice.

Dr. Gawande describes how his  family in India expected  to care for their elderly relatives, which differed from what he saw happen when they immigrated to the United States. After becoming a physician, he recognized that our care of the elderly often robs them of the well-being that he sought to promote in his practice.

He wondered how it can be done differently. To find out, he interviewed people who are developing novel ways to provide care to older people, care that preserves their independence, dignity and choices while still keeping them safe and protected.

Most of us either have relatives or friends facing these decisions, or are facing them ourselves. If not now, we all will eventually. Whichever the case, this book shows

“how the ultimate goal is not a good death but a good life-all the way to the very end.”

Atul Gawande
woman sitting in a cemetery
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Caring for dying people

Finally, Dr. Gawande discusses end -of -life care- that is, care when a disease has become terminal and a cure is no longer likely. Sometimes it is difficult to determine when that occurs. As he says, it is rare in medicine when there truly is “nothing more we can do”.

However, just because we can do something, doesn’t mean we should. Some treatments, rather  than extending life just prolong the suffering. Still it is heart wrenching for patients and families, along with their doctors, to decide that it is time to forgo treatment and instead opt for palliative care, with or without hospice.

(Palliative care focuses on symptom management and social and emotional support for patients and families.)

Dr. Gawande poignantly describes this process by sharing in detail his  father’s cancer diagnosis, treatment, progression, hospice care and death. He shows how difficult a process this can be, given that even he and his parents, all of whom are physicians, struggled to come to terms with the reality of terminal illness and the dying process. Though they were all familiar with and experienced in dealing with the medical system, they still felt unprepared to face the decisions required at the end of life. But in the end, both he and his father felt at peace with the outcome and Dr. Gawande senior did experience “a good life-all the way to the very end.”

Being Mortal is also available as a convenient low cost ebook from eBooks.com. (Using this affiliate link supports this blog.

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I  also enjoyed listening to this interview with Dr. Gawande-

 Atul Gawande on Priorities, Big and Small– a podcast interview with Tyler Cowen

Other books by Dr. Gawande

Complications : A Surgeon’s Notes on an Imperfect Science

In gripping accounts of true cases, surgeon Atul Gawande explores the power and the limits of medicine, offering an unflinching view from the scalpel’s edge. Complications lays bare a science not in its idealized form but as it actually is―uncertain, perplexing, and profoundly human.

Better: A Surgeon’s Notes on Performance 

The struggle to perform well is universal: each of us faces fatigue, limited resources, and imperfect abilities in whatever we do. But nowhere is this drive to do better more important than in medicine, where lives may be on the line with any decision.

Atul Gawande, the New York Times bestselling author of Complications, examines, in riveting accounts of medical failure and triumph, how success is achieved in this complex and risk-filled profession

The Checklist Manifesto:How to Get Things Right

Atul Gawande shows what the simple idea of the checklist reveals about the complexity of our lives and how we can deal with it.

sharing the HEART of lifelong care

I appreciate all of you who follow this blog; there are numerous other blogs to choose from so I am honored you chose to spend some time here. A special welcome to all my new followers from this past month.

Thanks for following this blog. If you’re visiting, I would love for you to start following Watercress Words : use the form to get an email notification of new posts. Don’t worry, you won’t get anything else from me. I also want you to find and follow me on Facebook, Pinterest , Instagram, and LinkedIn .

Thank you for  viewing  the advertisements and using the affiliate links  that fund this blog; with your  help, we can grow, reach more people, and support worthy causes that bring health and wholeness to people around the world.

                              Dr. Aletha