Category Archives: books, literature, arts

5 women physicians, multi-ethnic

Discover women physicians, the future of medicine

September is Women in Medicine Month.

Why celebrate women physicians?

In 1860 the United States had 200 women physicians.

By 1900, there were 7000.

Since 1975, the number of female physicians has grown more than six-fold, from 35,626 to 333,294 in 2013. Women physicians comprise 35% of actively practicing physicians. Follow this link for a detailed timeline of

A PROFILE & HISTORY OF WOMEN IN MEDICINE

Last year, for the first time since Elizabeth Blackwell was the first woman  in the U.S. admitted to medical school in 1849, more women than men entered U.S. medical schools and approximately half of all medical students are now female. This trend will likely continue, as fewer men are applying to medical school and more women are.

My medical school graduating class of 1978  at our 30th reunion; the original class was larger, 150 students, but the percentage of women was the same as in this photo. (I’m in the pink dress)

(This post contains commission earning affiliate links to help fund this blog)

Why are more women entering medicine?

In general women still lag in entering the STEM fields– science, technology, engineering, math. But I think the most important factor spurring  more women to enter medicine is the powerful example set by previous women physicians who have paved the way for us who entered medicine later. These include

Dr. Elizabeth Blackwell

The first woman graduate of a United States medical school was born in Bristol England in 1821. (thank you, UK readers). Elizabeth Blackwell came to this country as a child and originally had no interest in medicine. But when a dying friend told her, “I would have been spared suffering if a woman had been my doctor”, she found her calling.

She was denied admission to multiple medical schools. The Geneva Medical College of New York submitted her application to the student body for a vote, and, as a joke, they voted to admit her. Well, the joke was on them as she enrolled, completed medical school and graduated in 1849.

Read more detail about How Elizabeth Blackwell became the first woman doctor in the United States

With her sister, Emily Blackwell , who also  graduated from medical school, and a German physician, Marie Zakrzewska, they opened and ran the New York Infirmary for Women and Children in 1857.

Dr. Emily Blackwell  managed the Infirmary for 40 years. Dr. Marie Zakrzewska moved to Boston when she founded the New England Hospital for Women and Children, which trained  women physicians and cared for the poor.

Due to failing health, Dr. Elizabeth Blackwell retired from practice in the 1870s.

The Physicians Mom Group (PMG) declared Dr. Blackwell’s birthday February 3 as National Women Physicians Day. This day celebrates all the significant contributions that women physicians make daily, none of which would have been possible without Elizabeth Blackwell.

Dr. Blackwell embodied the ABC characteristics of extraordinary women physicians-

Attentive, Brave, Compassionate

Women physician members of CMDA providing medical care in Ecuador

Dr.Rebecca Lee Crumpler

Prior to founding her hospital, Dr.Zakrzewska served as professor at the New England Female Medical College. That school produced another notable women physician, Dr. Rebecca Lee Crumpler.

Dr. Crumpler graduated in 1864, becoming the first African-American woman to earn the M.D. in the United States.  After practicing in Boston, she moved to Virginia where she and other black physicians cared for freed slaves, who otherwise would have had no access to medical care. In 1883 Dr. Crumpler wrote a book of medical advice for women and children, titled A Book of Medical Discourses, one of the earliest medical publications by an African American.

Dr. Virginia Apgar

More recently, a woman physician’s work has impacted the lives of countless babies and their families. If you have had a baby, or been born within the past 60 years, you benefited from the work of Virginia Apgar, M.D.

She was neither an obstetrician or a pediatrician, but an anesthesiologist. As she observed deliveries of infants she proposed a scale to rate how well a newborn was adapting to life outside the mother.

crying baby

courtesy Pixabay

She considered 5 factors:

  1. heart rate
  2. respiratory (breathing) rate,
  3. muscle tone,
  4. reflexes, and
  5. color-pink (warm) or blue(cold)

And assigned each a score- 0, 1, or 2, at 1 minute of age, and again at 5 minutes.

So a newborn had a potential score as low as 0 and as high as 10.

The higher the score, referred to as the Apgar score, the more likely the baby was healthy and would do well. The lower the score meant the baby was in trouble, and needed intensive medical attention.

After testing the use of the rating scale over several years, doctors starting using it routinely; so for the past 50-60 years almost all babies have been “graded” with an Apgar score at birth. The Apgar score  is used widely throughout the world.

Dr. Apgar, who played violin and cello in her college orchestra, was appointed the first full professor of medicine at Columbia University and also was a director for the March of Dimes.

 

Dr. Laurel Salton Clark

More recently, Dr. Laurel Clark served her country as a flight surgeon with the U.S. Navy. She along with her husband Dr. Jonathon Clark joined NASA as astronauts.

Clark made her first space flight on Space Shuttle Columbia during STS-107 as a mission specialist. The extended-duration mission was dedicated to scientific research. The STS-107 crew successfully conducted more than 80 experiments.

On February 1, 2003  Clark and the STS-107 crew perished during re-entry as Columbia broke up over Texas en route to a landing in Florida. She amassed 15 days, 22 hours and 20 minutes in space.

During a memorial service at Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas, on Feb. 4, 2003, President George W. Bush emphasized Clark’s love for her family and her work.

“Laurel Salton Clark was a physician and a flight surgeon who loved adventure, loved her work, loved her husband and her son,” he said.

“A friend who heard Laurel speaking to Mission Control said there was a smile in her voice. Laurel conducted some of the experiments as Columbia orbited the Earth and described seeing new life emerged from a tiny cocoon. ‘Life,’ she said, ‘continues in a lot of places and life is a magical thing.'”

 

In this emotional interview, Dr. Jonathon Clark remembers his wife, who “sacrificed her life for space research.”

 

 

 

Please see these related posts about women physicians who are Changing the Face of Medicine

The surprising new doctors caring for you

Today is Armed Forces Day

 

 

Thanks to the American Medical Association for this post’s featured image.

Thank you for joining me to celebrate women physicians. If you haven’t met me already, please visit my bio page here-

Meet Dr. Aletha 

 

Please continue to follow this blog as we explore

and share the HEART of health

stethoscope with a heart

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BROKEN ARROW PERFORMING ARTS CENTER

Kristin Chenoweth, Oklahoma’s sweetheart, a little bit WICKED

A review of

A LITTLE BIT Wicked:Life, Love, and Faith in Stages

a memoir by Kristen Chenoweth

Like me, Kristin Chenoweth was born and raised in Oklahoma; unlike me, she is an award winning singer and stage, screen, and television actress.  She is loved and admired here in our home state, being an inductee into the Oklahoma Hall of Fame, as well as the Oklahoma Music Hall of Fame.

The Performing Arts Center in Broken Arrow

flies the flags of Oklahoma, the United States, and Broken Arrow.

I have been to the Broken Arrow Performing Arts Center in Oklahoma where she conducts an annual Broadway Bootcamp.  But I didn’t know much about her until I listened to the audiobook version of her memoir A Little Bit Wicked: Life, Love, and Faith in Stages, read by her. Now I almost feel like we are best friends.

The Kristin Chenoweth Theatre sign

Sign in the lobby of the Performing Arts Center -the theatre bears her name

From the opening paragraph, Kristen is candid, no nonsense, transparent, and hilarious. She’s one of those “you never know what she’s going to say next” people and you don’t want to miss  any of it. She is just as up front sharing her failures as she is celebrating her successes.

This part of the country is referred to as the “Bible belt” and Kristen admits to reading and believing it. So don’t be surprised when she mentions and even occasionally quotes from the Bible in her memoir. Like when she talks about the circumstances of her birth.

Kristen’s faith and family

Kristen was adopted at birth by a couple who had one child but were unable to have more. She describes herself as the product of “forbidden love.” Her biological mother was an unmarried flight attendant who became pregnant. Instead of  abortion or  raising a child alone, she opted for adoption. Kristin joined the Chenoweth family soon after birth.

Her adoptive parents have loved her and supported her career and she is immensely grateful to them.

Rather than being angry or bitter, Kristen is grateful to this woman who she says was kind enough to “let me go”. To illustrate, she tells a Bible story from the Old Testament about the wise King Solomon. It goes like this.

One day two women (prostitutes in some Bible versions) came to King Solomon,  and one of them said:

“Your Majesty, this woman and I live in the same house. Not long ago my baby was born at home, and three days later her baby was born. Nobody else was there with us.

One night while we were all asleep, she rolled over on her baby, and he died. 

Then while I was still asleep, she got up and took my son out of my bed. She put him in her bed, then she put her dead baby next to me.

In the morning when I got up to feed my son, I saw that he was dead. But when I looked at him in the light, I knew he wasn’t my son.”

 The other woman shouted.

“No! He was your son. My baby is alive!”

The first woman yelled.

“The dead baby is yours. Mine is alive!”

They argued back and forth in front of Solomon,  until finally he said,

“Both of you say this live baby is yours.  Someone bring me a sword.”

“Cut the baby in half! That way each of you can have part of him.”

The baby’s mother screamed.

“Please don’t kill my son. Your Majesty, I love him very much, but give him to her. Just don’t kill him.”

The other woman shouted,

“Go ahead and cut him in half. Then neither of us will have the baby.”

Solomon  pointed to the first woman saying,

“Don’t kill the baby. She is his real mother. Give the baby to her.”

Everyone in Israel was amazed when they heard how Solomon had made his decision. They realized that God had given him wisdom to judge fairly.

From 1 Kings 3

Contemporary English Version (CEV)

Copyright © 1995 by American Bible Society

She compares her birth mother to the woman who loved her child so much she would rather lose her than see her die. She believes,  “The ultimate test of love is letting go.”

Kristin won’t try to find her birth mother, refusing to intrude  on her privacy. She hopes she is happy, has a family, and knows how blessed Kristen’s life has been.

Kristen’s personal life

Unlike many entertainment celebrities, Kristen doesn’t seem to have any skeletons in her closet; she has avoided problems with alcohol, drugs, abusive relationships,  financial problems, or other scandals. 

Kristin makes living with  Meniere’s Disease sound like a sitcom. Meniere’s causes dysfunction of the inner ear, resulting in sudden, unpredictable, debilitating attacks of vertigo(dizziness),  nausea, and vomiting. Episodes resolves after a few hours or sometimes days.

There is no cure for Meniere’s except a radical ear surgery which might leave her with hearing loss. As a professional singer she doesn’t want to risk that, so she copes with the condition with humor and an unwillingness to let it stop her from fulfilling her work commitments.

Memorabilia from Kristin’s career on display at the theater in Broken Arrow

Kristin has her serious side, evident as she describes singing at her beloved grandfather’s funeral, and supporting her mother through breast cancer diagnosis and treatment.

She sometimes feels caught between  the Christian community which criticizes her liberal social views and her friends with unconventional lifestyles who are turned off by her uncompromising Christian witness. As she puts it, she wants to love and help everyone in the same way Jesus did; she doesn’t want to take sides or exclude people just because they are different. 

Kristen’s gown from her Broadway show is displayed in

the Performing Arts Center lobby

Kristen’s performing career

Kristen has and still does perform on the stage, movies, and television, and records albums. She won a Tony award as Sally Brown in “You’re a Good Man, Charlie Brown.”

an evening gown on display next to a photo of Kristen Chenoweth

Kristen receiving her Tony Award, photo and her evening gown displayed in the theatre lobby

I hope you will read, or better yet listen to Kristen’s memoir.

She may be “A Little Bit Wicked”, but I think you will love her as much as we do here in Oklahoma.

A Little Bit Wicked

These are affiliate links which support this blog in sharing the HEART of health.

Enjoy Kristin’s singing

Listen on Apple Music to COMING HOME

Buy on the iTunes Store THE ART OF ELEGANCE  album

And find it on Amazon

Thanks for joining me to meet Kristin Chenoweth and see a little bit of our home state.

If you have enjoyed this, please share and follow this blog. See you next time.

Dr. Aletha

 

WICKED- cover of a program from the musical

After hearing how wonderful it is, I finally saw the touring production of WICKED and it is every bit as “wicked” as everyone says.

Although Kristin no longer performs in it, other actresses bring Glinda and Elphaba to life with singing, non-stop action, and gorgeous costumes.

It may be based on a children’s story, but WICKED is a touching saga of love, friendship, betrayal, courage, and forgiveness. Don’t miss it if you have a chance to see it.

You can stream the WICKED album free with Amazon Prime (affiliate link).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Do you wonder why Kristin’s home town is named Broken Arrow? Find out here.

History of the name of Broken Arrow

a freshly baked apple pie

Labor Day, a book more interesting than the holiday

 

Labor Day

A novel by Joyce Maynard

Most of us don’t expect labor Day weekend to change our lives. As a holiday it doesn’t seem to have a purpose; it doesn’t celebrate or commemorate anything other than the end of summer. We use it as an excuse to take another day off from work and school.

When I saw and purchased the book in Barnes and Noble book store I didn’t recognize it as the book from which the movie Labor Day was made. I’m glad, because I probably would not have bought it.

I find that reading books after the movie or vice versa is seldom satisfying. Often characters and settings are changed so the storyline is confusing. And invariably the movie version leaves out much of the character development that a writer can express with words. I didn’t feel that way here.  But more about that later.

(There are multiple affiliate links in this post; their use supports this blog.)

Labor Day-  the characters -a woman, a man, a boy

Henry, who narrates the story, lives with his divorced mom in a small town. At 13, Henry seems more mature than he should need to be, while his mother Adele seems childish and naive for a grown woman. As the story unfolds, you begin to wonder  if Adele’s eccentric behavior is due to something more than immaturity.

Adele and Henry are in their small town store buying clothes for school when a man they don’t know approaches them asking for help. Frank seems nice enough and asking for help might not be a problem except for the fact that is is bleeding, and evasive about why.

He asks Adele to take him to her house and either due to fear or poor judgement, she says yes. Both she and Henry seem to realize that something dramatic is about to change in their lives, but what it is, they can only guess at this point.

LABOR DAY- a book review

Labor Day– the story

As the novel progresses, we learn several story lines.

The main story line, narrated by young Henry, tells what transpires between the three of them over this Labor Day weekend. Weaving throughout are the back stories of what brought them all to this point.

Henry has reached manhood by the end of the book, at which time we learn what happened to these characters years after this memorable Labor Day weekend.

If you want to believe, or already know, that the worst of situations can have a happy ending, the final chapter will please but not surprise you.

Joyce Maynard writes in closing remarks at the end of the book,

“Maybe it’s an impossibly romantic and idealistic story. No doubt ….it would be a very poor idea for a woman to bring home a strange man, as Adele does that Thursday before Labor Day. Perhaps this book should carry a warning label: DO NOT TRY THIS AT HOME.”

Medical themes addressed in Labor Day are heavily weighted around sexuality so if you are uncomfortable with those this book/movie may not appeal to you.

These topics include

  • Puberty and Adolescent sexuality
  • Adult sexuality, both in and outside of marriage

Other health issues explored in the story include

  • Pregnancy and pregnancy loss
  • Emotional/mental dysfunction
  • Marital dysfunction and divorce
  • Childhood disability
  • Trauma and death

 

Following their encounter with Frank in the store, young Henry talks about his feelings as Adele drove them home-

“In the seat next to her, I studied my mother’s face, to see if her expression changed, when Frank said these things. I could feel my heart beating, and a tightness in my chest-not fear exactly, but something close, though oddly pleasurable. I had it when my father took Richard and the baby and me, and Marjorie, to Disney World, and we got into our seats on the Space Mountain ride.

Today is my lucky day, Frank said. Yours too, maybe.

I knew right then, things were about to change. We were headed into Space Mountain now, into a dark place where the ground might give way, , and you wouldn’t even be able to tell anymore where this car was taking you.

If this had occurred to my mother, she didn’t let on. She just held the wheel and stared straight ahead same as before, all the way home.”

 

Ms. Maynard explains that as fiction this novel’s unfolding was

“a rare occasion, where a writer imagines a world in which goodness and honorable behavior might be rewarded and love might carry the day.”

Labor Day , the movie adaptation by Jason Reitman

Labor Day as a movie starred Kate Winslet as Adele and Josh Brolin as Frank.

Once I started reading the book, I remembered the movie, and cannot imagine any other actress portraying Adele; Ms. Winslet  aptly illustrated Adele’s quiet strength as well as her fragility . Young Henry is solidly played by Gattlin Griffith while Tobey Maguire as the adult Henry narrates the story and then appears in the movie’s final scenes.

As I mentioned above, the movie sticks faithfully to the novel. The backstories are not developed as much as in the book which is typical with the time limitation of a movie adaptation.

See below for a spoiler alert if you’ve already read/seen the book/movie, or don’t care about learning the ending too soon.

 

 

Another unlikely romance

Labor Day  reminded me of another book I read and reviewed, about the relationship between a woman, a man, and a boy. I wish it had a movie version ; another book by the same author does, Pay It Forward. Here is my review of

Say Goodbye for Now. 

Thanks for joining me to “celebrate” Labor Day and consider an unconventional  look at life and love in Joyce Maynard’s novel and movie, Labor Day.

You may enjoy some of my other book reviews, find links here.

 

Dr. Aletha, exploring the HEART of books

an open book with pages folded to make a heart

photo from Lightstock.com, affiliate link

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A true life romance also from Joyce Maynard

Joyce Maynard wrote a memoir, THE BEST OF US, about her true life romance which didn’t end as happily as her fictional one did, but did change her life forever. Here is a brief review.

 

Ms. Maynard’s story initially sounded like a  failed marriage/bad divorce saga with adult children torn between the two parents, persistent anger and bitterness, and attempts to ease the pain with a series of bad choices in lovers, followed by a complicated adoption attempt.

Finally we can breath a sigh of relief when she meets a man and seems to have found true love at last. But that comes to an abrupt halt when he is diagnosed with cancer.

From then on she poignantly describes a life turned upside down as she enters new territory as a caregiver. As she relates how their lives changed, we as the readers are changed also, learning to recognize what is truly important in life. As the author admits,

“success, money, beauty, passion, adventure, possessions- have become immaterial. Breathing would be enough.”

Read this book if you want your assumptions about life and death to be challenged and changed.

You can read the prologue of THE BEST OF US .

Spoiler alert: the following section reveals a major plot of Labor Day

At the book’s end,  Joyce Maynard wrote a final piece, “Don’t Try This at Home-How I Came to Write This Novel”, in which she explains why she chose to make an escaped convicted murderer (Frank) a main character in her novel-

Because she herself once struck up a long distance friendship with a man in prison .

She admits,

“I resemble that impossibly romantic woman who drove a man home with her, feeling no fear for herself or her son-though the man had blood dripping down his leg-because she saw in him something of her own wounded self.”

Her convict story does “not have a happy ending” she says,

“it taught me…to trust less and steer clear of the kind of man whose wounds on the outside may be fewer than those within.”

Here’s her story about that encounter

YOUR FRIEND, ALWAYS

The word "Read" written in black paint on a colorful watercolor washed background.

Sharing book reviews from Net Galley

Net Galley helps readers of influence discover and recommend new books to their audiences. If you are a librarian, bookseller, educator, reviewer, blogger or in the media, you can join for free.

I enjoy reading and sharing what I read with my blog followers, so joining Net Galley helps me accomplish both. I try to find books with a health/medical theme although occasionally I will pick something just for fun. But I find that almost any story portrays some  health related issues since it’s a universal concern.

SHARING HEALTH BOOK REVIEWS FROM NET GALEY

Here are two stories, both memoirs, but vastly different. One is a private personal story, the other a public  personal story.

The Best of Us

A Memoir

by Joyce Maynard

Ms. Maynard’s story opened with a  failed marriage/bad divorce saga with adult children torn between the two parents, persistent anger and bitterness, and attempts to ease the pain with a series of bad choices in lovers. Equally sad was her telling of a complicated  and ultimately failed adoption attempt.

Finally she and we can breath a sigh of relief when she meets a man and seems to have found true love at last. But that comes to an abrupt halt when he is diagnosed with cancer.

From then on she poignantly describes a life turned upside down as she enters new territory as a caregiver. As she relates how their lives changed, we the readers are changed also, learning to recognize what is truly important in life. As Ms. Maynard  writes,

“success, money, beauty, passion, adventure, possessions- have become immaterial. Breathing would be enough.”

Read this book if you want your assumptions about life and death to be challenged and changed. You may read an excerpt at this link

The Best of Us-Chapter 1

Tears of Salt

A Doctor’s Story

by Pietro Bartolo; Lidia Tilotta

Dr. Pietro Bartolo practices medicine on the tiny Italian island of Lampedusa, in the Mediterranean Sea. Lampedusa, known for its friendly people, sunny skies, pristine beaches, and turquoise waters famous for fishing, seems an idyllic place to live, work, and visit.

But for the past 20 years, Dr.Bartolo has cared for not just residents and tourists, but for hundreds of refugees- people who risk their lives crossing the Mediterranean from northern Africa, fleeing poverty and political unrest. The lucky ones land on shore injured and sick. The unlucky ones wash ashore dead, having died en route or drowning after falling from a capsized or wrecked boat, sometimes only a few feet from shore.

In this memoir, Dr. Bartolo shares the stories of many of these people, giving them the names and faces that we don’t see watching news stories about the refugee crisis. He also shares his own life story of growing up on the island, leaving for medical school, and returning to raise a family and to practice medicine.

Dr. Bartolo’s story was also told in the documentary film FIRE AT SEA

 

 

He never expected to become the front-line help for hundreds of desperate people. With no specific training on how to manage an avalanche of desperate, sick, and injured refugees, and with little resources, he manages to put together a system for triaging, evaluating, and treating these people, then sending them on for more advanced medical care or to immigration centers in Europe.

For the less fortunate, he serves as medical examiner, to determine the cause of death for those who do not make it to Lampedusa alive; sometimes taking body parts to extract DNA to identify them, so families can be notified. He states he has never grown comfortable to this aspect of his job.

As a physician myself, I marvel at Dr. Bartolo’s caring and commitment to people who will never be able to repay him for his sacrifice. He approaches his work as a mission of mercy, and treats every person with the utmost respect, no matter their circumstance. Some of the people he treats become almost like family; he has even tried to adopt a couple of orphaned children but cannot due to legalities.

Dr. Bartolo’s story reads like a conversation. I think you will like him, and admire him for his dedication and selfless service.  His life should encourage all of us to consider what we can each do to lessen someone else’s suffering.

 

 

Another book review from Net Galley is at this link-

COURAGE for the UNKNOWN SEASON- a review

 

I also review books for Tyndale Blog Network.  for whom I reviewed FIRE ROAD,   also on Net Galley. Here is the link to that review-

Love conquers fear-a memoir of hope

I received a free digital copy of these books (FIRE ROAD was a paper copy) in return for posting a frank review on my blog and/or social media.

 

 

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Do you celebrate Christmas in July?

Isaiah 9: 6, ESV

For to us a child is born,

to us a son is given;

and the government shall be upon his shoulder,

and his name shall be called

Wonderful Counselor, Mighty God,

Everlasting Father, Prince of Peace.

© 2001 – 2018 CROSSWAY

from the English Standard Bible 

Why am I sharing a Bible passage about Christmas in July? Not because stores may already be selling Christmas decorations.

This selection was read on Daily Audio Bible (DAB)  recently. I told you about DAB before and hope you’ve been listening to it with me daily or as often as possible.

DAILY AUDIO BIBLE screen shot

I listen to the chronological version, meaning the text is read in the order it happened or was written, rather than the order the books are arranged in the Bible.

(Affiliate links are used in this post. Using them allows you to assist in funding this blog at no extra cost to you. )

More info about DAB is in this previous post.

DAB is free and you can download on the App Store Appstore sm 0fc8af054ef36729b6ef1ee711c8be883bbf7600b04a74ca69fb961dec5b4d41

George Frideric Handel and Messiah

George Frideric Handel used this scripture from Isaiah in his famous work, Messiah, first performed in 1742, performed or heard by millions of people since then.

Although it’s usually performed at Christmas, Handel wrote it for Easter.

Handel’s father  was a barber-surgeon. Barber-surgeons were physicians in medieval Europe, who as the name suggests performed surgery, often treating wounds from war injuries. Eventually, surgery and barbery became separate occupations.

 

When is “Christmas” for you?

Do you plan for Christmas year round, or wait til the week before? What does Christmas mean to you? Please share your thoughts.

 

 

Thanks for exploring the Bible, Christmas, and the HEART of health with me.

Please share this post and follow this blog where I regularly inform and inspire you about health and share words of faith, hope, and love.

I appreciate your interest and support. Please visit my Reader Resources page

and help me share the HEART of health.

Dr.Aletha 

FAITH LOVE HOPE- words created with letter tiles

These three remain, faith, hope and love, and greatest of these is love. 1 Corinthians 13:13 (graphic from Lightstock.com)

man praying on holy bible in the morning

Opportunities to do good

Matthew 6:1-4, TLB-Giving to the Needy

“Take care! Don’t do your good deeds publicly, to be admired, for then you will lose the reward from your Father in heaven

When you give a gift to a beggar, don’t shout about it as hypocrites do- to call attention to their  acts of charity! I tell you in all earnestness, they have received all the reward they will ever get. 

 But when you do a kindness to someone, do it secretly—don’t tell your left hand what your right hand is doing. 

And your Father, who knows all secrets, will reward you.”

The Living Bible copyright © 1971 by Tyndale House Foundation. Used by permission of Tyndale House Publishers Inc., Carol Stream, Illinois 60188. All rights reserved.

if you do one good deed your reward is to do another and harder and better one. C.S. LEWIS,

graphic from stock photo site Lightstock.com, an affiliate site

(These and other affiliate links in this post will pay a commission to fund this blog if you purchase through them, with our appreciation.)

C.S. Lewis, author 

Author of the popular The Chronicles of Narnia fiction book/movie  series,

C.S. Lewis was a writer, teacher,  and lay theologian.

His books on Christian belief are read and quoted widely, years after his death.

The Chronicles of Narnia

C.S. Lewis

Women and C.S. Lewis

Helping in Secret

Leslie Koh, writer/editor for  Our Daily Bread  reflected on this passage in a devotional from November 26, 2017.

He wrote about  Denise, who mentored a hurting young woman in her church. She met with her frequently, counselling and praying.

But when a church staff member was assigned to work with the young woman, Denise felt overlooked and unappreciated.

Leslie reminded us that when we feel unappreciated (and all of us do at times) God recognizes what we do even when no one else does.

I think we might ask ourselves- What is my motive in helping others?

  • To serve myself by receiving  praise and recognition from other people?
  • To serve God, to receive His reward?
  • To serve others, obeying God’s command to “love your neighbor as yourself.” Matthew 19:19?

Helping the distressed

Recently Leslie  reflected on the Christian response to the world wide refugee crisis. In this piece for The Christian Post, he encourages us to

not mistreat foreigners and migrants-embrace them.

OPPORTUNITIES TO DO GOOD-watercresswords.com

“Some time back, people from abroad who work in my country started gathering on the church property for a picnic every Sunday.

This evoked a range of responses from fellow churchgoers. Some fretted about the mess the visitors would leave behind. But others saw this as a divine opportunity to extend hospitality to a wonderful group of strangers—without even leaving the church       grounds! “(excerpt)

I hope we all find “divine opportunities” to extend hospitality  and help to friends and strangers.

On my page, Share the Heart of Health, you will meet organizations that invite you to help them do good things for others around the world. Please visit it.

Learning from The Sermon on the Mount 

This post is based on a passage from The Sermon on the Mount by Jesus in the Bible book of Matthew. Here are some other posts about that passage.

The surprising blessing of discomfort

How to be blessed, happy, and healthy

How to satisfy hunger and thirst

5 unexpected rewards by ditching a critical spirit

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 faith, hope, and love

(1 Corinthians 13:13)

Thank you so much.    Dr. Aletha                 

1 Corinthians 13:13, photo from the Lightstock.com collection (affiliate link)

 

Statue of Liberty

New York City: music, museums, monuments, and medicine

One of my favorite vacations ever was to New York City. I was curious about it but not sure I wanted to go there. But when my son’s work took him there for a year, I decided it was time to visit him and the city. And I am so glad I went. It was magical.

lady, 2 men posing together in a restaurant

good food, great company, grand city

This post features one of my new affiliates. TopView Sightseeing  helps people tour New York City, and since there is so much to see and enjoy there I decided to share it with you.  ( I am not directly compensated for mentioning this business; these are affiliate links that pay a commission to this blog if you use them to purchase; you should pay nothing extra.)


Besides visiting New York City, I’ve mentioned  it in several previous posts, mostly book reviews. I’m going to share links to them as well as some of my travel photos.

(These posts also have affiliate links to books and book sites. )

A Natural Woman- Carole King shares a lifetime of music, a season of pain

I reviewed Carole King’s memoir, A Natural Woman. Carole was born in Manhattan, attended school in New York City, and started her musical career there. A musical about her life, Beautiful, plays on Broadway. (I saw Beautiful in Tulsa.)

couple in front of THE LION KING sign

We saw THE LION KING in New York

Working Stiff -a book review to remember 9/11

Another memoir, Working Stiff, happened in New York City. Dr. Judy Melinek and her husband T.J. Mitchell chronicled her work as a medical examiner with the NYC Medical Examiner’s office following the Trade Center attacks on 9/11.

New York City at night

New York City by night from the Empire State Building


NEW YORK CITY: MUSIC, MUSEUMS, MONUMENTS, AD MEDICINE-watercresswords.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sometimes Amazing Things Happen:Heartbreak and Hope on the Bellevue Hospital Psychiatric Prison Ward by Elizabeth Ford, M.D. 

I read this book in which  Dr. Elizabeth Ford reviewed her career as a psychiatrist at Bellevue Hospital, where she cared for  mentally ill patients in the criminal justice system of New York City.

When the hospital flooded and lost power during Hurricane Sandy she and the dedicated staff fought to get permission to  evacuate the prisoner patients who languished for days in a ward without running water or hot food.

What Patients Say, What Doctors Hear- a book review

Dr. Danielle Ofri has a special interest in and writes about the patient- physician relationship . She is an attending physician at Bellevue Hospital,  Associate Professor of Medicine at New York University School of Medicine, and writes for The New York Times.

She has written several books; I reviewed this one.

Pandemic- a book review

Medical writer Sonia Shah reviews the history of the cholera epidemic of NYC among others in her book Pandemic.

from the Metropolitan Museum of Art

MUSEUM-BEHIND THE SCENES AT THE METROPOLITAN MUSEUM OF ART

100 DRESSES

Our Tuneful Heritage


Celebrating romance and marriage on Valentine’s Day

In this post I told you about Marilyn vos Savant,  the smartest woman in the world , who lives in New York City!

Marilyn vos Savant is a national columnist for Parade and author of several books. The Guinness Book of World Records certified her for having the world’s highest I.Q.

She is an executive at Jarvik Heart, Inc., which manufactures artificial hearts for permanent and temporary use in the treatment of heart failure. Her husband Dr. Robert Jarvik invented it.

jewelry and ceramic figurines in a store window

window shopping

Summer Promotion at eBooks.com! Take $15 off on $100 or more purchase. Use code: SUMMEREBOOKScp. Valid until Sep 22, 2018


Summer Reading

I hope you enjoyed this post.

Let me know if you make it to New York City and what you did there. And  if you use  TopView Sightseeing   tell me about your experience, I’ll share it with other readers. And thanks for using the other affiliate links in this post, I appreciate your support of the blog.

Thanks for exploring New York City and the HEART of health with me.

Dr. Aletha     stethoscope with a heart