How to navigate the antibiotic highway

Now that we’ve covered some basics about antibiotics, let’s get specific. What you want to know is-

When do I need to take an antibiotic?

 

 

stoplight

Most medical experts believe we need to STOP using unnecessary antibiotics. (photo from Pixabay)

 

Experts consider as many as 50% of the antibiotics prescribed in the United States unnecessary or inappropriate. This causes

  • antibiotic resistance ,
  • avoidable side effects of the drugs, and
  • increased medical cost without benefit.

The best source of medical advice for you personally is your own doctor, or one who talks to and examines you.

Exceptions to rules exist, every medical situation is unique.  So although these recommendations are firm, they are not absolute. This is just a partial list which includes most but not all common infections.

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STOP- don’t treat these with antibiotics

Any form of upper respiratory infection including

  • colds,
  • laryngitis,
  • bronchitis,

“flu”-Influenza

infectious mononucleosis, aka “mono”

Acute viral gastroenteritis, aka stomach flu, with nausea, vomiting, and/or diarrhea

 

 

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SLOW DOWN- these may not need an antibiotic, at least not immediately

Ear infections -otitis media

Sinusitis– sinus infections

spider or tick bites- many of these are not bites at all, but are other skin diseases, including bacterial infections (see below)

sore throats– pharyngitis or tonsillitis

 

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GO- these infections need heavy duty action; you will likely need an antibiotic to recover from these conditions

Urinary tract infections– this includes the kidney, bladder, prostate

Skin infections including animal and human bites

Pneumonia (although can can be due to viruses, especially in children)

Whooping cough –pertussis

Lyme disease and Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever- these are both transmitted by tick bites; but not all tick bites result in infection

Sexually transmitted diseases caused by bacteria – gonorrhea, chlamydia, syphilis

Any infection severe enough to require admission to a hospital- including infections of any internal organ, bones, joints, brain; included here are infections which develop during a hospital stay

 

Check out the links for more info. You probably still have questions that I didn’t cover, so please ask and I’ll tell you more.

 

 

(By the way, I hope you enjoyed the photos. I took them at a Veterans Day parade.)

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I will be grateful if you will share this post on your social media pages?

And please follow Watercress Words for more information and inspiration to help you explore the HEART of HEALTH.

Thank you for  viewing  the advertisements and using the affiliate links  that fund this blog; with your continued help, we can grow, reach more people, and support worthy causes that bring health and wholeness to people around the world.

Sincerely, Dr. Aletha 

 

 

 

 

 

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Vaccination prevents disease- part 1

 

Prevention is a focus in healthcare now  and immunization has  been one of the most effective ways to prevent disease ever developed.

The list of diseases that are “vaccine preventable” is long and continues to grow.

Vaccine recommendations may be based on a person’s

  •  age,
  • gender,
  • ethnicity and
  • concurrent conditions, especially diabetes mellitus, chronic lung diseases, heart disease and  immune suppressing disorders.

Vaccine administration may vary by

  • the number of doses recommended,
  • how far apart the doses should be given, and
  • which vaccines can be administered at the same time.

 

Immunization protocols have  become so complex that even physicians have difficulty keeping it straight without the use of paper or digital checklists. This is one area where the Internet and EMRs (electronic medical records) can be useful.

Create an immunization schedule for your child from birth to 6 years of age

2016 recommended immunizations for children

2016 recommended immunizations for children (the 2017 schedule is available on the CDC website)

 

Vaccines for infections caused by bacteria

I use the name of the disease and/or the bacteria, rather than the vaccine name, since there are different brand names for the vaccines depending on the manufacturer.

So successful have these vaccines been that most young doctors have never seen a patient with these diseases (unless perhaps they specialize in infectious disease, immunology, emergency medicine or critical care). And even I, who graduated medical school in 1978, have only seen a few, and none in recent years.

Diphtheria-primarily a respiratory tract illness in young persons

Pertussis, better know as whooping cough, also a respiratory illness, which has made a comeback in recent years, apparently due to a waning of immunity

Tetanus, also called “lockjaw”– due to a toxin which may contaminate a dirty wound

Menigococcal disease, which is one of many causes of meningitis (inflammation of the brain lining), but one of the most deadly, even with treatment

Streptococcal pneumoniae disease; the vaccine is often referred to as the “pneumonia vaccine”, but the bacteria can also cause ear infections, sinusitis, meningitis and sepsis (bloodstream infection)

Haemophilus disease is similar to pneumococcal, but more of a concern in infants and children

 

Six Things YOU Need to Know about Vaccines

 

 

 Pneumococcal Vaccination from JAMA

infections caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae

 

 

 Pandemic- a book review

Infection is still a major health issue worldwide

and epidemics are still a threat. This book explains why.                 Pandemic by Sonia Shah

Vaccination prevents disease, part 2