Tag Archives: rashes

multiple American flags waving

for our “Safety and Happiness”-USA healthcare

“to institute new Government, laying its foundation on such principles and organizing its powers in such form, as to them shall seem most likely to effect their Safety and Happiness. ” the Declaration of Independence

To celebrate United States Independence Day this month, I have shared posts from health related government agencies on Facebook and Twitter. Let’s take a look at some of these posts here.

The National Institutes of Health posted this infographic about the challenges of communicating health risk .

 

Health risks are often misunderstood, underestimated, or overestimated. This chart explains how to know what to ignore and what to explore.

Remember that risk does not equal disease-there are few health risks that inevitably lead to illness, disability, or death.

 

 

The Smithsonian offered us this article about

8 diseases to watch out for at the beach

young women walking on a beach

 

 

 

Michelle Holshue is a nurse, an NIH researcher, and a global public health responder. She is one of more than 79,000 people who make HHS run every day.”

The Food and Drug Administration reminded us how to avoid getting allergic reactions from these plants -poison ivy, poison sumac,  and poison oak.

 

4 Tips to Outsmarting Poisonous Plants

 

 

Meet Nadja West

 

She’s a wife, mother, physician; oh, and by the way, a 3-star general in the U.S. Army, highest ranking woman ever to graduate from West Point.

 

 

 

 

Here’s my previous post about the United States healthcare system.

Let’s celebrate Life, Liberty and the Pursuit of Health Care

 

ribbon with words "made in the USA"

graphic from photo website Lightstock.com (affiliate link)

How has USA government healthcare impacted your life? Please share your experience or insights.

And please share this post. Thank you.

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young women walking on a beach

Don’t drink the water- how to avoid water related disease

 

You’ve probably heard the advice “Don’t drink the water” when you travel to less developed areas of the world. But water can make you sick even without drinking it.

Bacteria and other disease causing organisms can be transmitted by swimming and other water related sports

  • in private and public pools
  • recreational freshwater and oceans
  • hot tubs, splash pads, water parks
  • decorative fountains

 

Drinking, inhaling, and direct contact with water contaminated with a variety of bugs can cause a wide range of illness, most of which is preventable. Here is an overview of common conditions to watch out for.

 

 

Drowning-

The most serious risk of water is drowning or near drowning, with 3,300 deaths and another 5,000 hospitalizations annually in the United States.

Children are especially at risk of drowning. Teaching children to swim as early as practical and supervising them around pools and other bodies of water are critical to prevention.

Drowning Prevention

caution signs at a swimming pool.

Drowning can be prevented by following rules.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Gastrointestinal (stomach and intestines) illness-

Symptoms

Nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, cramps, fever

Causes

 

stream with a kayak

Water in creeks, streams, and rivers is not safe to swallow.

Respiratory (nose, throat, lungs) illness

Symptoms-cough, nasal/sinus congestion,ear pain/fullness,fever

Swimmer’s Ear

Causes-

  • pool chemicals
  • Legionella and other bacteria

 

rapids in a stream

 

 

 

Skin conditions

Symptoms– rash, redness, itching, burning

Causes –

 

Most of these conditions resolve without treatment, or are treatable with appropriate antibiotics.

 

two people dangling their legs into a pool.

Don’t let water related illness spoil your summer fun. photo from stock photo site- Lightstock.com- affiliate link

 

 

 

 

Serious but rare

Primary amebic meningoencephalitis is a rare but deadly sinus-related infection caused by Naegleria fowleri in freshwater and soil 

Leptospirosis is another brain infection caused by a group of spirochetes known collectively as leptospires. It also is infrequent.

How to prevent infection

  1. Water used for recreation should not be drunk ,even if treated with chlorine.
  2. Children younger than five years should not use hot tubs.
  3. Persons with diarrhea or recent diarrheal infection should not swim for one week after symptom resolution.
  4. Swimmers should shower before using a hot tub or pool.
  5. Don’t swim with open wounds, or use waterproof bandage if you do. .
  6. Learn more and get more tips on staying well at these links from

drawing of a child standing on a diving board at a pool

from the American Academy of Family Physicians

 

more information from American Family Physician

Waterborne Illnesses

Safe Surfing

Sea Creature Injuries and Fish Poisoning

Chicago skyline from Lake Michigan

city skyline and Navy Pier from a boat on Lake Michigan