Tag Archives: physicians

an open Bible next to a world globe

Why we should love our neighbor

Mark 12:32-34 New International Version (NIV)

 “Well said, teacher,” the man replied. “You are right in saying that God is one and there is no other but him.

To love him with all your heart, with all your understanding and with all your strength, and to love your neighbor as yourself is more important than all burnt offerings and sacrifices.”

 When Jesus saw that he had answered wisely, he said to him, 

“You are not far from the kingdom of God.” 

And from then on no one dared ask him any more questions.

New International Version (NIV)Holy Bible, New International Version®, NIV® Copyright ©1973, 1978, 1984, 2011 by Biblica, Inc.® Used by permission. All rights reserved worldwide.

FAITH, HOPE, LOVE in wooden block letters

Faith Hope and Love, graphic from the Lightstock.com collection

 Dr. Kent Brantly, missionary physician to Liberia

Dr. Kent Brantly awoke feeling ill- muscle aches, fever, sore throat, headache and nausea. As his condition progressively worsened to include difficulty breathing, he learned the cause of his illness- the Ebola virus.

Having spent the past few weeks caring for patients caught up in the Ebola epidemic that swept Liberia in the spring of 2014, Dr. Brantly had contracted the disease himself, and would likely die, as almost all victims do.

Dr. Brantly, a graduate of Indiana University’s School of Medicine, had volunteered to work at ELWA Hospital in Liberia which was receiving aid from Samaritan’s Purse, an international relief organization. This hospital served as Monrovia’s Ebola treatment center and Dr. Brantly headed the unit.

As his condition deteriorated, his physicians decided his only hope for recovery was use of an experimental drug, ZMapp, previously untested on humans. Since otherwise he was likely to die, he received the drug by infusion into a vein.

By the next morning he felt well enough to arise from bed and shower. Unknown to him, thousands of people around the world had been praying for him.

During this time his colleague, nurse Nancy Writebol, was battling her own Ebola infection. She also was treated with ZMapp.

Samaritan’s Purse arranged for both of them to be evacuated to the United States. There, they could continue receiving supportive medical care, as well as allow infectious disease specialists to learn from their conditions. It also would relieve the workload on the doctors who continued to care for Ebola patients at ELWA.

Dr. Brantly and his wife Amber, who had just left Liberia to return home for a visit, wrote a book about their experience,

Called for Life: How Loving Our Neighbor Led Us into the Heart of the Ebola Epidemic.

I hope you enjoyed these words of faith, hope, and love; please share and follow watercress words as we explore the HEART of health.

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Dr. Aletha 

WATERCRESS WORDS-Medical stethoscope and heart on a textured background

 

 

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5 spring health risks you need to prepare for now

Remember it’s Spring forward to Daylight Savings Time

Most of the United States will change to Daylight Savings Time on Sunday March 11, 2018.

So you will either be going to bed an hour later than usual, or awakening an hour earlier.

Either way, your body will tell the difference until your sleep cycle adjusts; I know mine always does.  WebMD offers these tips to make the change easier.

If getting a good night’s sleep is a persistent problem for you, check out the information I shared in this post.

Expert advice to sleep well every night

We welcome the  first day of Spring, March 20,  in the northern hemisphere, with the occurrence of the vernal equinox.

This link to The Weather Channel explains what the vernal equinox means.

graphic of the earth explaining equinox and solstice

original source not known

With more hours of sunlight and warmer weather you may spend more time outdoors.While that may mean greater fitness from the physical activity, you will be at risk of several outdoor injuries. Be proactive and prevent warm weather ailments with these tips.

Protect yourself against mosquitoes and other insects.

5 insect repellents to keep you safe this summer

Protect your skin with  sunscreen while you’re outside.

(These are affiliate links placed here for your convenience. This blog can earn a commission from sales from these links. This does not imply endorsement of these products.)

Protecting your feet.

Whether walking, jogging,  gardening, or sports, our feet can take a beating from outdoor activity.

You probably don’t worry much about blisters- until you get one. Then the pain can inhibit walking, or even  wearing a shoe.

At worst, blisters can become chronic wounds, get infected, and threaten limbs in susceptible persons like those with diabetes or poor blood flow.

 

I wear Skechers shoes for walking.

Ways to prevent blisters include-

  • Proper fitting shoes, not too tight or too loose
  • Breaking shoes in before activity likely to cause a blister, like running, dancing, long walks, sports
  • Wearing absorbent cushioned socks, perhaps 2 pair together
  • Applying protective padding over pressure points on the feet. Even plain paper tape can accomplish this, according to this study published in the New York Times.

What to do about seasonal allergies

Often called “hay fever”, allergic rhinitis doesn’t cause a fever but it can make us miserable with its characteristic symptoms-

  • runny nose, sneezing, congestion

    diagram of the nose and sinuses

    Allergies commonly affect the nose, throat, sinuses, ears, and eyes.

  • scratchy, itchy, or tickly throat
  • cough
  • ear itching and pressure
  • watery, itchy, red eyes

 

 

 

 

Even those  people who have these symptoms year round may have seasonal exacerbations, usually spring and fall.

 

Wearing a filter mask while outdoors may help minimize allergy symptoms.

 

 

 

Here is information about allergy management from the American College of Allergy to discuss with your doctor.

Seasonal Allergies

 5 spring health risks you need to prepare for now- watercresswords.com

 

 

I appreciate your sharing  this post on your social media pages.

And please follow Watercress Words for more information and inspiration to help you explore the HEART of HEALTH.

Thank you for  viewing  the advertisements and using the affiliate links  that fund this blog; with your  help, we can grow, reach more people, and support worthy causes that bring health and wholeness to people around the world.

 

                                                         warmest regards, Dr. Aletha 

stethoscope with a heart

exploring the HEART of health

multiple American flags waving

for our “Safety and Happiness”-USA healthcare

“to institute new Government, laying its foundation on such principles and organizing its powers in such form, as to them shall seem most likely to effect their Safety and Happiness. ” the Declaration of Independence

The  United States may not have “socialized medicine”, but several federal agencies and many laws regulate health care for us. Let’s look at some of them.

 

The National Institutes of Health posted this infographic about the challenges of communicating health risk .

 

Health risks are often misunderstood, underestimated, or overestimated. This chart explains how to know what to ignore and what to explore.

Remember that risk does not equal disease-there are few health risks that inevitably lead to illness, disability, or death.

 

 

The Smithsonian offers us this article about

8 diseases to watch out for at the beach

young women walking on a beach

 

“Despite its idyllic facade, the beach can be a dangerous place—and swimmer’s ear, sunburn and jellyfish stings may be the least of your worries. Beaches can get pretty dirty, and this pollution can come with some nasty pathogens.”

 

 

Public Health Service 

Michelle Holshue is a nurse, an NIH researcher, and a global public health responder. She is one of more than 79,000 people who make HHS run every day.”

The Food and Drug Administration reminds us how to avoid getting allergic reactions from these plants -poison ivy, poison sumac,  and poison oak.

 

4 Tips to Outsmarting Poisonous Plants

 

 

Meet Dr. Nadja West- United States Army

 

She’s a wife, mother, physician; oh, and by the way, a 3-star general in the U.S. Army, highest ranking woman ever to graduate from West Point.

 

 

 

 

Here’s another post about the United States healthcare system.

Let’s celebrate Life, Liberty and the Pursuit of Health Care

 

ribbon with words "made in the USA"

graphic from photo website Lightstock.com (affiliate link)

How has USA government healthcare impacted your life? Please share your experience or insights.

And please share this post. Thank you.

Dr. Aletha 

a woman in white coat with mask over mouth

A simple way to help your doctor beat burnout

 

What would you say to your doctor on your deathbed?

Would you remind them of the times you waited weeks  for an appointment or sat  in the waiting room long past your scheduled appointment time?

Would you ask them why they didn’t try harder to cure you? Would you ask why all the tests and medicines they ordered didn’t work to save your life?

Or would you ask, “How was your vacation?”

family skiing on mountain

one of many vacations with my family 

 

 

A patient named Rosemary

One woman did. In a JAMA  essay (Journal of the AMA), Dr. Wendy Stead , an internal medicine physician, described her patient, Rosemary, who “never had a bad interaction with any of her health professionals. After a clinic visit, or hospital stay, she will rave about the excellent care she received from the many teams involved.”

“This is not because we are all such exceptional caregivers.” she admitted. “It is because of the kind of patient she is..the kind who probes for the person behind the doctor.

When Rosemary was terminally ill, Dr. Stead left on a family vacation, fearing that her patient would die while she was gone. As soon as she returned, she went to Rosemary’s home to visit one last time.

Now so weak, Rosemary was confined to bed, and could barely speak. As Dr. Stead leaned over the bed straining to hear her, Rosemary asked,  “How was your vacation?”

 

Probe for the person behind the doctor

 

Dr. Aletha dancing

I actively pursue a hobby-ballroom dancing.

 

 

Do you know if your doctor has children or grandchildren?

What hobbies they pursue?

Who is their favorite sports team?

 

 

 

 

My husband and his eye doctor share an interest in  the Oklahoma City Thunder basketball team. At each visit, he and Dr. Nanda spend a few minutes discussing the team’s progress, good or bad.  It makes what otherwise would be a dry, routine visit into a special occasion. I think Dr. Nanda enjoys it as much as Raymond does.

Chesapeake Arena

Chesapeake Arena, home of our beloved Thunder Basketball team – Dr. Nanda has season tickets and follows the team closely.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

When I was expecting my second son, William and Audrey became my patients. William had multiple serious health conditions but he was always positive and never complained.

During his frequent office visits, they never failed to inquire about the progress of my pregnancy. After I delivered they always asked about my new baby boy.

When I walked into the exam room, William’s first words were always, “How are you Doc?” And the next words were, “How’s the baby?”- even though by the time William passed away, my “baby” was in kindergarten.

woman with a toddler

Me with “the baby”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Seeing doctors and patients as people

For physicians, our patients’ “social histories” help us understand factors in your life that impact your health -where you live, your job, your family, your hobbies . Besides that, we enjoy getting to know you, especially the things that make you and your life unique and interesting. Dr. Stead points out that when our patients learn our social history we “build an even stronger bridge that goes both ways.”

Now you probably won’t have the time or interest to “probe” every doctor you see, maybe just those you see regularly . Exchanging a few social words can make the encounter more satisfying for both of you. Some of us will be more open about sharing our personal lives, and some subjects may be off limits. But I don’t think any of us will object to honest, caring interest in our lives outside of medicine.

“As healthcare professionals we like to think of compassion as a limitless resource, but some days even the deepest well can feel like it’s running dry. Patients like Rosemary refill the well. They make us better doctors for all our patients.” Dr. Stead 

 

Burnout- bad for doctors and patients

Leaders in the medical community recognize the high and increasing rate of burnout in physicians. In burnout, physicians feel exhausted,  lack enthusiasm about work, lose motivation, and feel cynical about the value of the medical profession. Some estimate as many as 50% of physicians in the United States experience burnout.

Perhaps even more common among physicians is compassion fatigue, which can affect anyone involved intensely in helping others. Compassion fatigue occurs when a helper begins to feel overwhelmed and stressed from their efforts to relieve the pain and suffering of those they help. As they give more of themselves and neglect self care, they in turn become traumatized by their own efforts.

(Photo credit-American Academy of Family Physicians)

 

Doctors on the “front lines” of medicine -family physicians, emergency physicians, internists, pediatricians, psychiatrists- are especially vulnerable to burnout and compassion fatigue as are other health care workers, police, social workers, teachers and disaster workers.

 

 

 

 

 

Why should you care about physician burnout and compassion fatigue?

Factors causing physician burnout include the technological and bureaucratic hassles in medical practice that hinder doctors from spending adequate and quality time with patients and interfere with our ability to care for patients in the way we believe is best.

Studies suggest that burnout causes physicians to spend less time providing direct care to patients, and that care may be less efficient and effective. 

 

According to observational studies of physicians at work, we spend 50% of our time doing paper/computer work about the care we provide the other 50% of the time. (photo credit- American Academy of Family Physicians)

 

 

 

 

 

March 30 is National Doctor’s Day, a day designated by Congress to honor doctors.

One way you can honor your doctor is by trying to connect personally next time you visit. By doing so, you may get a glimpse of the “person behind the doctor” ; empathy can go both ways. If you see your doctor as a person with a life not that different from yours, you may see your interaction as a partnership and  find it easier to communicate .

And better communication can lead to better care for you. See my previous post

3 keys to effective communication with your doctor

Why patients sue their doctors

Dr. Aletha examining an infant on a volunteer trip

Volunteering to serve where we are most needed is one way physicians can recover from burnout and compassion fatigue.

 

Read  here about how government regulations contribute to physician stress

And here about efforts to reverse and prevent physician burnout

 

 

 

 

 

Thanks for exploring the HEART of health with me. Please consider these affiliates which help this blog inform and inspire wellness and wholeness throughout the world.

Dr.Aletha a world globe with two crossed bandaids

 

 

 

 

When Breath Becomes Air by Paul Kalanithi

When Breath Becomes Air- reflections from Dr. Lucy Kalanithi

 

When Breath Becomes Air

by Paul Kalanithi, M.D.,

a memoir

( This is an update of a previous post. This post contains an affiliate,commission paying link)

Dr. Paul Kalanithi was a 36-year-old resident physician who had, as he wrote, “reached the mountaintop” of anticipating a promising career as a neurosurgeon and neuroscientist. He had a loving wife, a supportive family and professors who respected his knowledge and skill. He seemed destined to be sought after, well paid, productive, successful, and  famous.

(note: a neurosurgeon treats  brain, spinal cord and nerve  diseases such as brain tumors that can be cured or improved with surgery,)

Unfortunately, “the culmination of decades of striving evaporated” when he was diagnosed with an aggressive form of lung cancer for which the prognosis was bleak, even with treatment. He was admitted to the very hospital where he trained as a neurosurgery resident, now  to learn what it is like to be a patient with a potentially terminal illness.

When Breath Becomes Air by Paul Kalanithi

Dr. Kalanithi faced his diagnosis with the same resolve, fortitude, and determination that served him well through medical school and a grueling neurosurgery residency. After his first round of treatment he was able to return to the operating room as a doctor, not a patient.

Prior to entering medicine, Dr. Kalanithi had studied literature, earning degrees in English literature as well as human biology. He also completed a doctorate in history and philosophy of science and medicine at Cambridge. Thus, when he realized he was facing his own death, he turned to his first love of writing to chronicle his experience and to explore “what makes human life meaningful?” And as he explored the meaning of what life is all about, he also explored the inevitability of death.

“I began to realize that coming in such close contact with my own mortality had changed both nothing and everything. Before my cancer was diagnosed, I knew that someday I would die, but I didn’t know when. After the diagnosis, I knew that someday I would die, but I didn’t know when. But now I knew acutely. The problem wasn’t really a scientific one. The fact of death is unsettling. But there is no other way to live.”

Dr. Kalanithi passed away without completing his book, although his wife writes in the epilogue, “When Breath Becomes Air is complete, just as it is.” She and his parents kept their promise to have his book published after his death. She writes, “Paul was proud of this book, which was a culmination of his love for literature.”

Even before I finished reading this book, I felt as if I knew Paul and his wife Lucy. As someone who also enjoys writing, I can understand and appreciate his desire to preserve and share this experience.

This memoir is not so much a diary of what happened to Dr. Kalanithi as what happened within him as he confronted his own mortality and chose not to let it define the remainder of his life.

On the copyright page, “Death and Dying” is included in the list of categories for this book. However, you will not find “how to die” instructions here. Instead, you will learn how one man and his family chose to live despite knowing that he would  soon die.

His wife, Dr.Lucy Kalanithi, has recently spoken publicly about her husband, his illness, his death, and the memories he left her and us through his book. Listen as she reflects on his legacy in this interview .

“In the end, it cannot be doubted that each of us can see only a part of the picture….Human knowledge is never contained in one person. It grows from the relationships we create between each other and the world, and still it is never complete. And Truth comes somewhere above all of them, where, as at the end of that Sunday’s (scripture) reading,

“The sowers and reapers can rejoice together. For here the saying is verified that ‘One sows and another reaps.’ I sent you to reap what you have not worked for; others have done the work, and you are sharing the fruits of their work.”

(note: the referenced scripture is from the Bible, John chapter 4, verses 36-38, precise version unidentified)

I am glad I read this book and think you will be also.

When Breath Becomes Air  was published by Random House.

Other reviews of his life and writing

I regularly review and recommend medical and health related books. I hope you will follow .

Watercress Words on Facebook

 

Watercress Words is on Facebook where I post additional content to explore the heart of health just like I do here- posts to inform, instruct and inspire you . If you haven’t visited me there, please do.

Here are a few of my recent Facebook posts.

Do you qualify to donate blood?

This article from the New York Times health blog explains who can and can’t donate blood.  If you meet the qualifications, consider donating in your community. You may help save a life.

Too Old to Donate Blood? Maybe not.

person donating blood

photo compliments of Pixabay

Wednesday Word is where I define and discuss a medical term , like this one.

endemic- natural to or characteristic of a particular people or place

Medically speaking, an endemic disease occurs in a particular place or a particular population; for example, malaria is endemic to tropical areas; malnutrition is endemic to people suffering from famine.

Related words are

epidemic– a sudden severe outbreak of a disease in a particular location or group , such as influenza epidemics.

pandemic– an epidemic becomes wide spread, across countries and continents

Are you looking for a new doctor?

This article offers sound advice on finding and choosing a physician, and  how to prepare for your first visit.

Thanks to Nurse Beth at her blog Boomer Highway.

You’re A Candidate For

Good Health & A Good Doc

Dr. Oglesby nametag

How much do you know about your doctor’s training and experience? Make sure you choose a doctor for the right reasons.

I share humorous medical cartoons on  Friday Funny.

I am particularly fond of the antics of the organ characters from The Awkward Yeti.

( note this is an affiliate link)

And  inspiration from some fun-loving, dancing nurses.

Shared from InspireMore.

Celebrating change

At one time, I worked at a hospital whose motto was “we’re changing lives” in healthcare.In their promotions, they would share stories about patients whose lives have been improved through their medical care.
Sometimes the people who work in healthcare have had their lives  changed, also.
I have recently shared these examples on the blog Facebook page .

Kevin Morton entered a hospital the first time  with a bullet in his chest. Years later, he has returned- this time with a stethoscope around his neck.

 stethoscope with a heart

Detroit gunshot victim inspired to become doctor

Karen Muraszko was born “handicapped” but her parents didn’t see or treat  her as disabled. Neither did she. So she learned to help other children with the same diagnosis she has- spina bifida.

Doctor with spina bifida defies expectations 

Spina bifida is a neural tube defect – a type of birth defect of the brain, spine, or spinal cord. It happens if the spinal column of the fetus doesn’t close completely during the first month of pregnancy. This can damage the nerves and spinal cord. Screening tests during pregnancy can check for spina bifida. Sometimes it is discovered only after the baby is born.

The symptoms of spina bifida vary from person to person. Most people with spina bifida are of normal intelligence. Some people need assistive devices such as braces, crutches, or wheelchairs. They may have learning difficulties, urinary and bowel problems, or hydrocephalus, a buildup of fluid in the brain.

The exact cause of spina bifida is unknown. It seems to run in families. Taking folic acid can reduce the risk of having a baby with spina bifida. It’s in most multivitamins. Women who could become pregnant should take it daily.

NIH: National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

 

 

 

 

 Nanette Monroe didn’t listen when people told her she was “too old” to pursue her dream. She did anyway, and now she helps others do the same.

 

 

Svetlana Kleyman‘s life was changed, first by an unexpected illness which left her with a physical disability, and then by other people’s response to it. She’s still fighting to get her life back.

SUNY wouldn’t let me finish residency

 

 

And Dr. Heimlich may be 96 years old and retired, but he is still changing lives with the famous maneuver he developed. Listen to how he saved a woman’s life recently.

 

 

 

 

How to perform the Heimlich maneuver on a choking victim