Kids with migraine-a book review

Ms. Stein introduces her book by explaining it is fiction based on personal experience, so when she describes the migraine “aura” she understands what that means. (Aura is the intial sign of an impending migraine headache, usually visual changes.)

The Day My Best Friend and a Migraine Slept Over

Written by Audrey Beth Stein

Illustrated by Ana Solarte

Author Audrey Beth Stein could have written a cute, fun to read book for kids  about “the day my best friend slept over. But by adding “and a MIGRAINE” she took it to the next level, creating a fun learning activity as well. For that reason, I recommend it for kids as well as their parents.

an 8 year old with migraine

Migraine doesn’t affect everyone but those who suffer with this debilitating condition know the physical pain is just one aspect of it. The other is the way it disrupts life, often unpredictably-like when this 8 year old girl is anticipating a fun adventure with her best friend Allie.  

Ms. Stein introduces her book by explaining it is fiction based on personal experience, so when she describes the migraine “aura” she understands what that means. (Aura is the intial sign of an impending migraine headache, usually visual changes.)

As she narrates Allie’s “throbbing headache”, we learn how with her parents’ help she copes with the pain and disability, and how working together they manage to save her special day.

We don’t learn much about how her friend reacts to Allie’s distress, but she shows concern and doesn’t create more stress for her hosts. In the end both girls have fun doing the kinds of things all kids should get to enjoy without migraine getting in the way. 

I’ve been so moved by the response to this book… I truly had no idea when I started writing how many people experienced migraine, and I’m grateful to know that the book is touching a chord. As reviewer Shirley A. Sanders says, “My little one suffers migraines, so she appreciates knowing she doesn’t suffer alone.”

Audrey Beth Stein

The colorful illustrations by Ana Solarte do more than show us what happens. She captures the emotions of migraine with details that reflect Allie’s distress and highlight her parents’ attempts to relieve it.

If your child gets headaches

I was surprised that there is no medical disclaimer, but the author did not present her ideas as medical advice.

As with any health information media, I advise against using it for diagnosis or treatment without personal medical direction. If your child has unexplained headaches I suggest you seek medical consultation with a qualified health professional.

I received a complimentary advance reader copy of this book via NetGalley and the publishers.

“This book should be
read by parents, teachers, friends
and families of migraine sufferers.
Congratulations to the author for
bringing this information to a greater
audience.”

Marc Irwin Sharfman MD
Board Certified Neurologist
Headache Institute, Longwood Florida

Further reading about migraine in kids

Headaches in Children

Migraine Variants In Children

Dolores de cabeza

exploring the HEART of health in books

I appreciate all of you who are following Watercress Words, and if you aren’t I invite you to join the wonderful people who are. You can meet some of them in the sidebar, where you can click on their image and visit their blogs. Use the form to get an email notification of new posts. Don’t worry, you won’t get anything else from me.

Medical stethoscope and heart on a textured background

Dr Aletha

Exploring the HEART of grandparenthood

Why would I talk about grandparenting on a medical blog? Health professionals consider the family a vital factor in health, both positive and negative. You probably know that family medical history contributes to physical health, but family interactions also play an important role in child development, learning, and emotional health.

I was grilled.

Grilled as in “intense questioning or interrogation.” And that’s not a bad thing, it was all in fun and I’m sharing it with you here.

Grandma’s Briefs

Lisa Carpenter writes a blog called Grandma’s Briefs where she

shares my snippets, er, briefs on the good, bad, humorous, and heartwarming of being a grandmother, baby boomer, parent to adult children, wife, and writer.

One of the features on her blog is Grilled Grandmas, where she interviews other women who are both bloggers and grandmothers. Her blog challenges the stereotype of rocking chair grandmothers way past their prime in life.

a woman with her arms around 2 little girls on each side
Establishing a bond with grandparents is great for kids in many ways.
photo from Lightstock.com

Why talk about grandparenting?

Why would I talk about grandparenting on a medical blog? Health professionals consider the family a vital factor in health, both positive and negative. You probably know that family medical history contributes to physical health, but family interactions also play an important role in child development, learning, and emotional health.

Establishing a bond with grandparents is great for kids in many ways. Grandparents can be positive role models and influences, and they can provide a sense of cultural heritage and family history. Grandparents provide their grandkids with love, have their best interests at heart, and can make them feel safe.

Bonding With Grandparents

My grilling

Some of the interview questions Lisa sent challenged me to answer. Some answers I knew right away, others required some reflection . For example, this question

What is the most challenging part of being a grandma?

my answer-

Not having had a role model. Both of my grandmothers died before I was born, so I never experienced having a grandmother in my life.

This question was easy.

What is one thing (or more) you’re proud to say you do right as a grandma?

We (including the grandpa) offer advice and help when asked, but we don’t butt in, interfere, criticize, or make demands. We let the parents be the parents.

Lisa asked me to submit a few photos of me with my grandkids; perusing my photos to pick out a few sparked many happy memories.

Lisa’s final question was –

What one bit of advice would you give a new grandma?

Learn the answer at Lisa’s post which you will find at this link-

Grilled Grandma: Grandma Aletha

a man reading to two young girls, sitting in a woman's lap
Family interactions play an important role in child development, learning, and emotional health. photo from Lightstock.com

Taking Care of Your Grandchildren

This article gives grandparents a refresher course in caring for children. Whether they are with you for just a few hours, several days, or live with you, this gives practical tips on keeping them healthy and safe when they are in your care.

CPR

If you don’t already know CPR, consider taking a class or refresher course. CPR is done differently in children than adults. Infants and children are more likely to suffer respiratory arrest -quit breathing- than cardiac arrest-heart stopping. Common causes include choking, drowning, and trauma. Sources for training include

  • American Red Cross
  • American Heart Association
  • your local schools’ adult education programs
  • local hospitals and medical training programs

sharing the HEART of grandparenting

I appreciate all of you who are following Watercress Words, and if you aren’t I invite you to join the wonderful people who are. You can meet some of them in the sidebar, where you can click on their image and visit their blogs. Use the form to get an email notification of new posts. Don’t worry, you won’t get anything else from me.

Dr Aletha

cheesy-free faith-focused stock photos

Lightstock-quality photos and graphics site- here. 

(This is an affiliate link)

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