Can medical knowledge make you a better patient? Take this quiz.

The purpose of board certification is to make sure you, the patient, are getting the best care possible from a physician.

Parents and educators in my state have been debating the merits of standardized testing for school children and maybe where you live also. And it’s not just a question for children, adults can be subjected to professional testing also.

After I finished my family medicine residency, I took an 8 hour paper multiple choice written exam to become certified by the American Board of Family Medicine (ABFM). And every 10 years since I have taken the test to re-certify. (Originally it was every 7 years).

The purpose of board certification is to make sure you, the patient, are getting the best care possible from a physician. According to the ABFM,

We promise that board certification means that the family physician you choose for your care meets high standards. 

My certification expires at the end of 2019.

Eventually the Board transitioned to a computer based exam taken at a local testing center, still 8 hours long. This year they are trying something new- doctors can take the test on their own computer or tablet whenever and wherever they choose.

The new system is a trial and voluntary. Those of us who have chosen to do it give feedback on the process, what we like and don’t like about it. They hope this will prove to be a workable system that eventually everyone will do.

Here is another experience and opinion about the exam from Clif Knight, M.D. , who is the AAFP’s senior vice president for education.

Certification Pilot Proves Worthy Alternative

a male doctor using a tablet while working
Doctors can answer questions on a computer or tablet any time of day or night.

This exam consists of 25 questions posted quarterly over 3 years, with a 5 minute time limit for each question . Besides being able to take the exam in my pajamas, I can research the answers online if I need to-as long as I can do it in 5 minutes. The rules prohibit me from discussing the questions with another person, based on an honor system that I attest to before beginning each session. Being able to look up information is more like actual medical practice.

More aligned with adult learning principles, this approach allows for use of references and promotes greater retention of new knowledge to be applied in daily practice.

ABFM web site

You can learn more about the value of board certification at this link

American Board of Family Medicine Patient Page

While board certification is a voluntary process, many organizations prefer or require the physicians they hire or work with to be board certified.

Take an “exam” designed for patients

I thought I would give you a taste of what I am doing by creating a patient certification exam for you. The rules prohibit me from sharing actual test questions so I have written my own, in simple medical terms, but using a format similar to the questions I answer.

When I answer questions, I get immediate feedback if my answer was right or wrong, with an explanation and a reference. So I have done the same for you. In this case, the reference is from a blog post I have written.

There’s no time limit for each question and for this exam, feel free to discuss your answers with someone else, I encourage you to. Choose the single best answer. Check at the end for the correct answers.

I had fun writing these questions so I hope you have fun answering them. Good luck! I hope you pass.

Question 1

A woman came to her doctor with a skin rash soon after starting to take a new medication. The medication is most likely

  1. An Antidepressant
  2. A blood pressure lowering drug
  3. An anti-inflammatory drug
  4. An antibiotic

Question 2

A 25 year old woman notices that the skin on her face has darkened over the past several months. This condition is called

  1. Melasma
  2. Eczema
  3. Psoriasis
  4. Tinea

How common meds hurt skin

Skin: Epidermis and Dermis illustration
Line drawing showing cross-section of dermal and epidermal skin layers. National Cancer Institute Creator: Unknown Illustrator This image is in the public domain and can be freely reused. Please credit the source and, where possible, the creator listed above.

Question 3

A mother brings her 8 year old daughter to her family doctor. The child has a cough, runny nose, and mild sore throat. Her temperature is 100.2 degrees. The doctor diagnosed the illness as a cold, or upper respiratory infection and explains this is caused by a virus. She does not prescribe an antibiotic because

  1. The child is allergic to penicillin
  2. The family does not have health insurance
  3. The mother has left over antibiotic from another child at home.
  4. An antibiotic will not help an infection caused by a virus.

How to cope with winter illness

Question 4

A 30 year old woman comes to her doctor because she is losing an excessive amount of hair. She is afraid she will become bald. Most likely she

  1. Started using a cheap shampoo
  2. Delivered a baby
  3. Needs vitamins
  4. Should investigate hair implants

Effective solutions if you experience hair loss

Question 5

Dr. Oglesby believes that certain medications should be used more often because of their benefit to patients. These drugs include all except

  1. Antibiotics
  2. Vitamins
  3. Sleeping pills
  4. Stop smoking drugs

7 underused drugs

Question 6

A young man who is a computer programmer has difficulty falling asleep. His doctor may recommend

  1. Buy a new mattress
  2. Taking a sleeping pill an hour before bedtime
  3. Regular exercise and relaxation techniques
  4. Watching television until he falls asleep

Expert advice to sleep

a simple bed, window shade down, small lamp on a side table

Question 7

Author and motivational speaker Nick Vijucic was born with amelia. This term means he lacks certain parts of his body which are his

  1. Limbs
  2. Eyes
  3. Ears
  4. Teeth

Light and life without limbs

Question 8

A woman sees her doctor because she researched her symptoms online and believes she has endometriosis. She thinks this because

  1. She does not have regular periods.
  2. She had a miscarriage.
  3. She has not been able to get pregnant.
  4. Her sister has it.

Women’s health update

Question 9

The HPV (human papilloma virus) causes cancer. Vaccination against this virus decreases the risk of cancer of the

  1. Cervix
  2. Uterus
  3. Breast
  4. Ovary

Women’s health update

Question 10

Kristin Chenoweth, Tony Award winning actress and singer, suffers from Meniere’s syndrome. She was born in a small town in Oklahoma named

  1. Muskogee
  2. Broken Arrow
  3. Ada
  4. McAlester

Kristin Chenoweth– a review of her memoir

a letter jacket, bag, and shoes, belonging to Kristen Chenoweth
Kristin’s jacket from high school on display at the Performing Arts Center

ANSWERS TO QUESTIONS

  1. The most common drug that causes a skin rash is an antibiotic.
  2. Melasma
  3. Antibiotics do not help a cold or any other viral infection
  4. delivered a baby; hair loss is common after pregnancy
  5. Stop smoking drugs can be useful to help smokers quit. The other drugs listed are often overused.
  6. Exercise and relaxation can improve one’s sleep.
  7. Nick was born without limbs.
  8. Infertility is a common symptom of endometriosis.
  9. Cancer of the cervix is caused by the HPV virus.
  10. Broken Arrow. The other Oklahoma towns produced Carrie Underwood, Blake Shelton, and Reba McIntyre.

testing the HEART of health

Thanks for testing your knowledge with this first ever Watercress Words Certification Exam. If you liked it, let me know, maybe we’ll do it again.

I appreciate all of you who follow this blog; there are numerous other blogs to choose from so I am honored you chose to spend some time here. A special welcome to all my new followers from this past month.

To start following Watercress Words , use this form to get an email notification of new posts . Please find and follow me on Facebook, Pinterest and LinkedIn, links are on the left side bar here and the Home page. Thanks so much.

                              Dr. Aletha 

(This post contains affiliate links which, by paying a commission if used for a purchase, help fund this blog. )

RoboForm Password Manager. What I use to manage passwords.

Go to this link to try RoboForm Free; if you like it you can upgrade to RoboForm Everywhere version with all the features I mentioned above. With Roboform, you will have one less thing to feel stressed about.

Surprising myths and truths about dental care

Why people neglect dental care and why they should not

I notice more  television commercials for dental care products and services, and most of them follow a theme. In the past most advertisements were for toothpaste for preventing cavities. Now they focus on whitening, stain removal, straightening, dentures and dental implants.

There is a series of ads for dental clinics that promise “not to rob you” featuring skits portraying people afraid that dentists will demand huge amounts of money for dental care.

woman dentist with a patient

Myths about dental care

I think these ads reflect  myths about dental care that many of us believe and unfortunately base our behavior  on. We need to dispel these myths with some truths about oral health, which includes our teeth and mouth.

These myths include

  • Care of our teeth is mainly a cosmetic concern, affecting our appearance only.
  • Dental care is a luxury, nice but optional, not a necessity, it can be ignored.
  • Dental care is expensive and out of reach without insurance or a high income.
  • Tooth disease and loss is inevitable, so we might as well just accept it.
  • Dental care is low priority, behind food, housing, and medical care in importance.
Surprising myths and truths abut

Truths about dental care  

But the truth, based on recommendations from experts in oral and dental health, tells us differently.

  • Care of our teeth is functional- we need a healthy mouth for eating, drinking, breathing, and talking. Our mouths also help us interact with other people emotionally- frowning, smiling, kissing, singing.
  • Oral care is a basic component of health care, vitally important to overall health. I’ll say more about this later.
  • Dental care can be affordable; it’s probably more costly if neglected.
  • Loss or disease of teeth and other mouth disorders are preventable and treatable.
  • Dental and oral care is vital to overall good health, and ultimately can be cost effective.
Family of 4 sitting at a dining table.
Our mouth- eating, talking, smiling-connects us with our family and friends.

Our teeth and oral cavity, the “window to general health”

The oral cavity, or simply called the mouth ,includes the teeth and gums, as well as the lips, the tongue, the palate (roof of the mouth), and the mucosa (sides of the mouth).

diagram of the mouth from the National Cancer Institute
The underside of the tongue and nearby structures (lip, tongue, salivary glands, and floor of the mouth) are identified. Alan Hoofring (Illustrator) public domain

 


Why  dental care improves our overall health.

Over 100 diseases and at least 500 medications can affect our teeth and mouths. Regular dental care can monitor for these effects and prevent them from progressing into tooth disease.

Our mouths contain over 500 species of bacteria and other organisms, some of which are protective and some destructive to our teeth. Good oral care can keep these in proper balance to prevent tooth and gum disease.

People with poor dental health have a higher incidence of heart attacks and stroke. Experts have not determined if this is direct cause and effect or coincidence, but believe it may be due to increased atherosclerosis (hardened arteries from cholesterol) due to the chronic inflammation of gingivitis.

Bacteria from the mouth can lead to  pneumonia in susceptible persons, like those with emphysema or those hospitalized with critical illnesses or injuries.

Diabetes, when the blood sugar is not controlled, negatively impacts periodontal health, and periodontitis makes glucose control more difficult. Periodontitis is inflammation and infection of the ligaments and bones that support the teeth.

Poor oral health during pregnancy increases the risk for miscarriage, low birth weight, preeclampsia, and stillbirth.

 

Resources for understanding different types of dental and oral disease.

Gum Disease-Also called: Periodontal disease

Tooth disorders

Oral Cancer from the American Dental Association

Paying for dental care

Dental care should not be a luxury, and can be within financial reach with some research into available options. These sites can help you discover what you may quality for.

When You Don’t Have Dental Insurance

Free/Low-Cost/Sliding Scale Dental Clinics

 

 

The importance of dental care for children

Health teeth in adults ideally starts with dental care in childhood. Jenny Silverstone, blogger at Mom Loves Best, has created this  infographic about caring for children’s teeth. I suggest you also read her in depth article about helping children have healthy teeth. 

How to care for your child's teeth

 

 

Don’t neglect adult dental care

Continuing good mouth and tooth care as an adult can help you avoid tooth loss, painful gums, or other problems. If you have any problems with your teeth or concerns about your mouth, see your doctor or dentist right away.

a doctor looking into a patient's mouth
Michael Munger, M.D., examines a patient at his medical office in Overland Park, Kan. courtesy American Academy of Family Physicians

 

Here are some helpful things you can do:

  • Brush your teeth at least twice a day with a fluoride toothpaste.
  • Floss your teeth at least once a day.
  • Don’t smoke or chew tobacco.
  • Ask your doctor if your medicines have side effects that might damage your teeth.
  • Look inside your mouth regularly for sores that don’t heal, irritated gums, or other changes.
  • See your dentist every 6 months for regular check-ups and cleanings. 

(source: familydoctor.org)

Using a power toothbrush may keep your teeth healthier, especially if you have any difficulty using a manual brush.I use an Oral-B Rechargeable Toothbrush by Braun.

(This is an affiliate link. )

Oral B Rechargeable Toothbrush

I appreciate your reading and sharing  this post on your social media pages.

And please follow Watercress Words for more information and inspiration to help you explore the HEART of HEALTH.

Thank you for  viewing  the advertisements and using the affiliate links  that fund this blog; with your  help, we can grow, reach more people, and support worthy causes that bring health and wholeness to people around the world.

Dr. Aletha  , sharing the HEART of health 

stethoscope with a heart

7 questions about health you need to ask now

Looking at the many facets of health #TheLuckyYears#FastMetabolism

What does “health” mean to you?

Health- flux and adaptation

Let’s continue exploring the heart of health by looking at a couple of interesting books. In a previous post we considered the WHO (World Health Organization)definition of health

“a state of complete physical, mental, and social well-being

and not merely the absence of disease or infirmity.”

Or you could also say

There's a Lot More to Health than Not Being Sick by Bruce Larson

“There’s a Lot More to Health than Not Being Sick”

So, what is “a lot more”? 

I’m introducing you to two medical writers who believe  health is multifaceted and not centered around the presence or absence of disease.

(Note: this post uses affiliate links to sites where you might make a purchase which will help fund this blog; your help is appreciated. )

Enjoying life to the fullest

Despite the author’s  impressive credentials, I was skeptical about a health book called “The Lucky Years”, as if health is just a matter of the luck of the draw or throw of the dice.  book cover- The LUCKY YEARS by David B. Agus, M.D.

The author is David B. Agus, M.D. , Professor of Medicine and Engineering at the University of Southern California , , author of two bestselling books and a CBS News contributor.

In The Lucky Years- How to Thrive in the Brave New World of Health Dr. Agus covers some hefty topics including

  • how the human body ages
  • Innovative cancer treatments with immunotherapy , DNA sequencing, and molecular targeting
  • The use of clinical trials to study new treatments for cancer and other diseases
  • How cancers metastasize (spread)
  • Potential uses for stem cells
  • New insights into the development of antibiotic resistance
  • Proteomics- study of the body’s proteins
  • The relationship of antibodies to common viruses to onset of chronic diseases

Rather than highly technical detail he offers a broad overview of these new technologies and how they may help treat and potentially prevent the main causes of death, that is cancer and chronic diseases like heart disease and diabetes.

He recommends patients understand and use technology to maintain and improve their health and not rely solely on their doctor to do so and to actively participate in the healthcare system.

He believes that health data will be used to prevent, detect and treat disease and to prolong life.

Large quantities of such data, organized in a secure database, will help us predict risk and recommend preventive measures, such as already done with

  • Colonoscopy to prevent deaths from colon cancer
  • Aspirin and statin use to prevent cardiac deaths
  • Management of low grade cancers conservatively, avoiding the use of surgery or chemotherapy

Health is in perpetual flux. 

I agree with Dr. Agus’ views on what health is, or rather what it is not.

“I don’t know what true health is, particularly on an individual basis.

For person A, health can be living totally free of illness and disability.

For person B, however, perhaps health means managing a condition well and enjoying life to the fullest despite some disability.

While we can certainly try to measure health in a variety of ways- weight, cholesterol, blood sugar, blood cell count, hormone levels, markers of inflammation, how you look, and how well you sleep, for example- none of those figures or generalizations will tell the whole picture.

And they won’t reveal how many years and days you might have left on this planet.”

He offers this advice –

“I encourage you to view your total health as a complex network of processes that cannot be explained by looking at any one pathway or focal point. Health is in perpetual flux.

The body is an incredible self-regulating machine. You don’t need to do much to support its health and optimal wellness.”

A constant state of healthy adaptation

Nutritionist Hailey Pomroy, author of Fast Metabolism Food Rx, recommends using food as “metabolic medicine.”  book cover- FAST METABOLISM FOOD RX BY HAYLIE POMROY

“Food integrates with your body to create health in a powerful way.”

She explains health using a formula E + M = H which means

Eating, Exercise, Environment  plus

Metabolism, metabolic pathways, Me  equals

Health, Homeostasis, Harmony

In this formula, E stands for everything we put into our bodies as well as everything around us, including people, your job, the weather.

M is what is inside of you, including your genetic makeup, and what happens when your body processes (or metabolizes) food, nutrients, toxins, medications.

“Health doesn’t always mean you are disease free, It means your body has created a homeostasis or internal balance, …is a constant state of healthy adaptation or flux.”

Considering their advice, think about what health means to you.

Use these questions to get started.

  1. Do you use any type of technology to manage your health and medical care? If so, is it helpful, or just more busy work?
  2. What is your relationship with your personal physician? Do you rely on your doctor to tell you what you should do, or recommend what you should do to stay healthy and treat ailments?
  3. Do you know what  medical conditions you are at risk for, and what you can  do to prevent them?
  4. What health measures are important to you, like blood pressure, cholesterol, weight, BMI, mammogram, and why?
  5. Are you “living life to the fullness” and if not, why not? What could you change to make that happen?
  6. How do you use food?
  7. What factors make up your E and your M? Do they add up to the Health that you want to create?

If none of these questions fit your answer, that’s ok, I want to hear your thoughts on health. Share your answers in the comments, or in a message if you prefer to remain anonymous, I will share and discuss them in a future post. Thank you.

Contact Dr. Aletha

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Do you know the best questions to ask about your healthcare?

expectations, concerns, obstacles-medical communication #askthedoctor

I blog about healthcare communication because you need to understand your doctor better and  we doctors need to understand our patients’ expectations, concerns and obstacles.

Physicians should  use clear understandable plain language with patients. Patients should also be clear and specific when they talk to their doctor.

You may think your doctor knows exactly what you mean, but sometimes we are left trying to read between the lines of what you tell us.

Dr. Aletha talking to a mother and her son
Talking to a patient through an interpreter makes communication extra challenging.

You know it’s important to tell us details of your symptoms, medical history, family history, habits, and other medical facts.   But besides medical information about you , we need to know

Your expectations about your care,

Your concerns about your care,

Your obstacles to getting care,

You may wonder, won’t or shouldn’t my doctor ask me theses questions? Sure, we can ask and probably will, but by volunteering it , you start dialogue that gets you and your doctor communicating effectively much faster. Your doctor knows about disease, but you as the patient know the experience of the illness much better. 

Let me illustrate by giving you some examples. These are all statements patients say  to me in my daily practice. The original statements aren’t bad or wrong, but by rephrasing to add some additional detail they  give your doctor valuable information that will help provide you the best care possible.

The underlined words can be substituted for others listed in parentheses.  The exact words aren’t as important as the  message they convey. 

Hello doctor, I’m here because I want my thyroid checked.

(substitute heart, lungs, cholesterol, blood sugar, kidneys, etc.)

Instead try-

Hello doctor, I’m tired a lot, and wondered if it might be a thyroid problem or something else. What testing would help us find out what’s wrong with me?

It’s better not to limit your doctor to checking just one thing, when there are many possible explanations for your symptoms. You expect a thyroid check, but you’re open to other possibilities.

tubes used to collect blood samples in a lab

 

Doctor, I feel terrible and think I have  pneumonia. The last time I felt like this the doctor said it was pneumonia, so it must be that again.

( sub kidney infection, strep throat, sinus infection)

But if you say this

Doctor, I feel so sick. This illness is similar to when I was diagnosed with pneumonia and I’m afraid I have it again. I am concerned it’s pneumonia again so  I’m here to find out what is wrong, as I realize it may be something else.

You’ve told the doctor your concern about pneumonia but you’re not trying to diagnose yourself.

 

 

I have a family history of cancer so I want to have a mammogram.

(sub any other cancer, heart disease, stroke and other tests)

That’s good, but this is better.

Doctor, I’m concerned about breast cancer as it runs in my family. My grandmother was diagnosed at age 45 and now my sister has been, and she is 40. Do I need a mammogram or any other testing now?

Knowing who in your family had a disease and at what ages helps the doctor make an accurate recommendation. It also tells your doctor this may be an emotional issue  (concern)  for you.

Top 10 cancers in the U.S.

 

 

I need an antibiotic (anti-inflammatory, muscle relaxer, steroid, shot )  for this; I know because my previous doctor always gave me one for this.

Please try this instead:

When I had this before my doctor prescribed an antibiotic; I wonder if that would be appropriate this time?

This tells the doctor your expectation, but also that  you are open to different  advice/recommendation. (and avoid getting a medication you don’t need.) 

6 smart facts about antibiotic use

 

 

 

Will my insurance pay for this? How much will this cost me? Is this an expensive drug?

Patients may expect us to know about insurance and cost, but often we don’t. We can work with you on financial issues if we know more about your obstacle. Try asking-

I need to find out if this is covered by my insurance. Can someone in your office look that up, or help me find out?

I’ve had a lot of medical bills this year that have stretched my budget. I will need to find out what my out of pocket cost will be before scheduling this test. Can your office help me with that?

If there is a generic version of this drug that will work just as well, I would like it, to minimize my out of pocket cost. If not, is there another alternative?

 

 

Is this drug safe? (effective, good, best, dangerous, harmful)  

Few things are 100% safe. But what we can discuss with you is –

What are the risks and side effects of this drug? Is the benefit I get from the drug worth the risks? Are there alternatives that would be effective and less risky?

We always should be concerned about drug use, and safety isn’t the only issue. Don’t hesitate to ask questions.

medication capsules

 

 

 

 

 

How long will I be off work? When can I go back to work?

Here’s what your doctor needs to know –

My job requires me to stand and walk for several hours?

(sit and type; talk on the telephone; drive long distances in my car)

And here’s what you need to ask:

How soon should I expect my stamina to return so I can work part time? Full time?

When can I safely work without interfering with my recovery?

What can I do to hasten my recovery so I can return to work sooner?

Both  you and your employer, need to know when it is safe to return to work.  We have to balance health concerns with your financial concerns and what is expected and allowed by your employer and the law. 

If you are clear  with your concerns and obstacles  and flexible in your expectations it will be easier for your doctor to make the right decision.

 

 

These are just a few examples. I’m sure you can think of others.

Whenever you have a need to consult a physician, think ahead of what your

expectations, concerns and obstacles are before you make the visit so you’ll  be

prepared to share .

Here are  more tips on talking with your doctor-

How to talk to your doctor to improve your medical care

How to tell your doctor what’s wrong with you.

I invite you to follow this blog as we explore the HEART of health together.

 

Dr. Danielle Ofri’s book  What Patients Say, What Doctors Hear,

details the reasons doctors and patients don’t communicate well

and offers ways to improve our interaction.

What Patients Say, What Doctors Hear by Danielle Ofri, MD
written by Danielle Ofri, M.D.

(this is an affiliate link)

Watercress Words on Facebook

 

Watercress Words is on Facebook where I post additional content to explore the heart of health just like I do here- posts to inform, instruct and inspire you . If you haven’t visited me there, please do.

Here are a few of my recent Facebook posts.

Do you qualify to donate blood?

This article from the New York Times health blog explains who can and can’t donate blood.  If you meet the qualifications, consider donating in your community. You may help save a life.

Too Old to Donate Blood? Maybe not.

person donating blood
photo compliments of Pixabay

Wednesday Word is where I define and discuss a medical term , like this one.

endemic- natural to or characteristic of a particular people or place

Medically speaking, an endemic disease occurs in a particular place or a particular population; for example, malaria is endemic to tropical areas; malnutrition is endemic to people suffering from famine.

Related words are

epidemic– a sudden severe outbreak of a disease in a particular location or group , such as influenza epidemics.

pandemic– an epidemic becomes wide spread, across countries and continents

Are you looking for a new doctor?

This article offers sound advice on finding and choosing a physician, and  how to prepare for your first visit.

Thanks to Nurse Beth at her blog Boomer Highway.

You’re A Candidate For

Good Health & A Good Doc

Dr. Oglesby nametag
How much do you know about your doctor’s training and experience? Make sure you choose a doctor for the right reasons.

I share humorous medical cartoons on  Friday Funny.

I am particularly fond of the antics of the organ characters from The Awkward Yeti.

( note this is an affiliate link)

And  inspiration from some fun-loving, dancing nurses.

Shared from InspireMore.

Weekend Words -a wedding update

 

2 Corinthians chapter 4 

16 So we do not lose heart. Though our outer self  is wasting away, our inner self is being renewed day by day. 17 For this light momentary affliction is preparing for us an eternal weight of glory beyond all comparison, 18 as we look not to the things that are seen but to the things that are unseen. For the things that are seen are transient, but the things that are unseen are eternal. (English Standard Version) 

If you read this blog regularly or even occasionally, you know that I like to write updates on topics I’ve covered. This is one update I would rather not need to share with you.

This past week, Swift, the groom in this video, died from the cancer that he has so bravely endured for several years. Abbi, above a bride, is now a young widow.

Please keep her and their families in your thoughts and prayers.

Weekend words is a regular feature of watercress words. At the end of the work week we take a break from exploring strictly medical topics to read words of faith, hope and love from the Bible and other carefully selected sources.

Disclosure:

This blog gains no financial benefit from  any charitable organization mentioned here. I recommend you investigate before donating anywhere. Affiliate links will be identified.

Weekend Words from 2 Corinthians and a wedding

 

2 Corinthians chapter 4 

 

16 So we do not lose heart. Though our outer self is wasting away, our inner self is being renewed day by day. 17 For this light momentary affliction is preparing for us an eternal weight of glory beyond all comparison, 18 as we look not to the things that are seen but to the things that are unseen. For the things that are seen are transient, but the things that are unseen are eternal. (English Standard Version) 

 

 

 

 

I don’t know Abbi and Swift, but they live in my city, and I have friends and colleagues who work at this hospital. This kind of event doesn’t surprise me at all; people here do things like this for each other, I hope they do in your town also. By the way, see the people watching outside on the sidewalk- it was almost 100 degrees that day. That’s love too.

 

 

 

Weekend words is a regular feature of watercress words. At the end of the work week we take a break from exploring strictly medical topics to read words of faith, hope and love from the Bible and other carefully selected sources.

Disclosure:

This blog gains no financial benefit from  any charitable organization mentioned here. I recommend you investigate before donating anywhere. Affiliate links will be identified.