Tag Archives: physician-patient communication

person holding the Holy Bible

How to face your health challenges with hope

Featuring Weekend Words from

James chapter 5, verses 2-5, Common English Bible

My brothers and sisters, think of the various tests you encounter as occasions for joy. After all, you know that the testing of your faith produces endurance.

Let this endurance complete its work so that you may be fully mature, complete, and lacking in nothing.

But anyone who needs wisdom should ask God, whose very nature is to give to everyone without a second thought, without keeping score.

Wisdom will certainly be given to those who ask.

Be passionately in love with understanding. St. Augustine

St. Augustine, early North African Christian theologian and philosopher graphic from Lightstock.com, affiliate link






Proverbs chapter 2, verses 2-10, Common English Bible 

Turn your ear toward wisdom,
    and stretch your mind toward understanding.
Call out for insight,
    and cry aloud for understanding.
 Seek it like silver;
    search for it like hidden treasure.
Then you will understand the fear of the Lord,
    and discover the knowledge of God.
The Lord gives wisdom;
    from his mouth come knowledge and understanding.

 Wisdom will enter your mind,
    and knowledge will fill you with delight.


Thanks to Sarah Forgrave for permission to use this excerpt from

Prayers for Hope and Healing

Seeking God’s Strength as You Face Health Challenges

by Sarah Forgrave

Prayers for Hope and Healing by Sarah Forgrave

Prayers for Hope and Healing by Sarah Forgrave


“When you’re confused by medical jargon”

“Medical staff talk to you, but they might as well be speaking a foreign language. Whether they’re explaining your condition or giving instructions for the next steps of your care, their words go into your ears like a secret message you can’t decode. You know they’re talking about your body, but the disconnect to your brain leaves you helpless and frustrated.

a prayer-

I’m so thankful for the doctors and medical staff  You’ve charged with my care. Even though I don’t always understand their words, it’s comforting to know You’ve given them the knowledge they need to treat my condition. ”



Learn how to understand your doctor and make yourself understood with these previous posts-

Do you know the best questions to ask about your healthcare?

“You may think your doctor knows exactly what you mean, but sometimes we are left trying to read between the lines of what you tell us.  We doctors need to understand our patients’ expectations, concerns and obstacles.”

How to talk to your doctor to improve your medical care

“You may think doctors make a diagnosis based on lab tests or xrays. But much of the time, those tests only confirm what we already suspect  based on your symptoms.

If we misunderstand what you describe, or fail to get complete information we may  start testing for something far removed from what is wrong with you.”

And have a cup of tea with me.

 Thank you for considering  affiliate links that support this blog.

Weekend Words-

sharing words of faith, hope, and love

(1Corinthians 13:13)

the word BLOG

What doctors want you to know about healthcare

If you want to know what doctors think, and more importantly, how they feel about their jobs, read KevinMD.

(This post has affiliate links.)

Founded by Dr. Kevin Pho in 2004, this blog features articles by thousands of doctors, representing multiple specialties, ages, genders, ethnicity and practice setting. They write on multiple topics related to health, the science, practice, business, and politics of medicine, the doctor-patient relationship, and anything else even remotely related to medicine and health care.

On KevinMD  you will not find detailed infographics, slick images, or cute printables. Rather you will find stories filled with raw emotion as physicians  candidly share the horrific  struggles, the occasional remarkable successes, and the everyday grind  of providing healthcare to hurting, needy, sometimes demanding, occasionally grateful patients. And you will hear from patients whose experiences with physicians and the healthcare system range from sublime to horrendous.

You may not like or agree with some of the things you read there-I often don’t and I’m a doctor myself. That’s part of the point of this blog. We physicians are not homogenous. We are individuals with different stories to tell from differing points of view, based on background, training,  and experience.

The blog is divided into sections based on broad categories of topics –

physician, patient, policy, tech, social media , meds, conditions.

Some of the articles are directed to patients while others are physician oriented. I encourage you to read some of both, in addition to the ones I am sharing here.

Many of the physician authors write their own blogs, so it is a good place to explore and discover other health bloggers that you may enjoy.

How doctors feel about relationships with patients-

Dr. Jennifer Lycette , an oncologist who blogs at The Hopeful Cancer Doc, offered her take on a situation that I have encountered more than once myself.

Don’t call me “Mrs.” Call me “Doctor.”


“To address a female physician as “Mrs.,” even if she is married, is to imply that despite all her professional accomplishments, her worth is reduced to her marital status. It ignores all the hard work that went into earning the title of “Doctor,” and denotes, whether intentional or not, that a female physician is somehow less deserving of the title than a male physician.”Dr. Oglesby nametag







 How patients feel about communicating with doctors

Martine Ehrenclou is a patient advocate.  She is the author of Critical Conditions: The Essential Hospital Guide to Get Your Loved One Out Alive and The Take-Charge Patient.

She submitted an interesting piece on a controversial topic, that of patients recording their visits with doctors, either with or without permission.

“patients are in fact secretly recording conversations with their doctors without asking permission first.

Talk about a blow to the doctor-patient relationship.

I understand the hesitation to ask permission to record an office or hospital visit with a medical provider as I experienced it myself. But secretly recording is a violation of trust. Why would any patient surreptitiously tamper with the relationship with their doctor, something that is considered the cornerstone of quality care?’

Documenting information your doctor gives you is essential because it’s just too easy to misunderstand or forget the medical information conveyed. “

She offers these

Tips to remember what the doctor tells you.




How doctors think about treating illness

Dr. Eileen Sprys is a family physician who wants you to know

When you have a cold, why I’m not giving you an antibiotic

“I want you to know that as a physician, I feel a pang of insecurity, guilt, and sadness when a patient tells me they’re upset because I won’t write an antibiotic.  I don’t want you to be sick or miserable.

I understand how inconvenient and sometimes life altering a cold can be. I desperately, desperately wish that I had a cure for your cold, but none of us do.

I also want you to know that for every antibiotic I over-prescribe, that I run the unnecessary risk of making someone even more sick, even to the point of hospitalization or death. I went into medicine to help you and to relieve your suffering with integrity — and that by giving you antibiotics without indication, I am betraying my own purpose.”




What doctors want you to know but don’t have time to tell you

a vision refractor

An ophthalmologist is a physician (doctor of medicine, MD, or doctor of osteopathy, DO) who specializes in the medical and surgical care of the eyes and visual system and in the prevention of eye disease and injury.

Dr. Brian C. Joondeph is an ophthalmologist and can be reached on Twitter @retinaldoctor. This article originally in the HealthZette reveals

8 things doctors secretly want to tell their patients

Number 8 is “I’m only human.”

 “We have our good days and bad days just like anyone else. We try to always have a smile on our faces, be upbeat and cheerful. But we, too, are affected by life’s challenges — work, family, finances, health, and so on. Don’t be too quick to judge and criticize!”

What doctors do away from their practice

KevinMD does have a few photos, and even some videos. I enjoyed this one by physician-comedian Brad Nieder, MD who blogs  at the The Healthy Humorist. In this clip he explains how he learned to eat less.



After you explore KevinMD, please come back and leave a comment about a post you especially liked, learned something from, or maybe disagreed with.