Tag Archives: physician-patient communication

person holding the Holy Bible

How to face your health challenges with hope

Featuring Weekend Words from

James chapter 5, verses 2-5, Common English Bible

My brothers and sisters, think of the various tests you encounter as occasions for joy. After all, you know that the testing of your faith produces endurance.

Let this endurance complete its work so that you may be fully mature, complete, and lacking in nothing.

But anyone who needs wisdom should ask God, whose very nature is to give to everyone without a second thought, without keeping score.

Wisdom will certainly be given to those who ask.

Be passionately in love with understanding. St. Augustine

St. Augustine, early North African Christian theologian and philosopher graphic from Lightstock.com, affiliate link

 

 

 

 

 

Proverbs chapter 2, verses 2-10, Common English Bible 

Turn your ear toward wisdom,
    and stretch your mind toward understanding.
Call out for insight,
    and cry aloud for understanding.
 Seek it like silver;
    search for it like hidden treasure.
Then you will understand the fear of the Lord,
    and discover the knowledge of God.
The Lord gives wisdom;
    from his mouth come knowledge and understanding.

 Wisdom will enter your mind,
    and knowledge will fill you with delight.

 

Thanks to Sarah Forgrave for permission to use this excerpt from

Prayers for Hope and Healing

Seeking God’s Strength as You Face Health Challenges

by Sarah Forgrave

Prayers for Hope and Healing by Sarah Forgrave

Prayers for Hope and Healing by Sarah Forgrave

 

“When you’re confused by medical jargon”

“Medical staff talk to you, but they might as well be speaking a foreign language. Whether they’re explaining your condition or giving instructions for the next steps of your care, their words go into your ears like a secret message you can’t decode. You know they’re talking about your body, but the disconnect to your brain leaves you helpless and frustrated.

a prayer-

I’m so thankful for the doctors and medical staff  You’ve charged with my care. Even though I don’t always understand their words, it’s comforting to know You’ve given them the knowledge they need to treat my condition. ”

 

 

Learn how to understand your doctor and make yourself understood with these previous posts-

Do you know the best questions to ask about your healthcare?

“You may think your doctor knows exactly what you mean, but sometimes we are left trying to read between the lines of what you tell us.  We doctors need to understand our patients’ expectations, concerns and obstacles.”

How to talk to your doctor to improve your medical care

“You may think doctors make a diagnosis based on lab tests or xrays. But much of the time, those tests only confirm what we already suspect  based on your symptoms.

If we misunderstand what you describe, or fail to get complete information we may  start testing for something far removed from what is wrong with you.”

And have a cup of tea with me.


 Thank you for considering  affiliate links that support this blog.

Weekend Words-

sharing words of faith, hope, and love

(1Corinthians 13:13)

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Michael Munger, M.D., consults a patient at his medical office in Overland Park, Kan.

What doctors want you to know about healthcare

 

Read KevinMD

If you want to know what doctors think, and more importantly, how they feel about their jobs, read KevinMD.

(This post has affiliate links.)

Founded by Dr. Kevin Pho in 2004, this blog features articles by thousands of doctors, representing multiple specialties, ages, genders, ethnicity and practice setting. They write on multiple topics related to health, the science, practice, business, and politics of medicine, the doctor-patient relationship, and anything else even remotely related to medicine and health care.

On KevinMD  you will not find detailed infographics, slick images, or cute printables.

You will find stories filled with raw emotion as physicians  candidly share the horrific struggles, the occasional remarkable successes, and the everyday grind  of providing healthcare to hurting, needy, sometimes demanding, occasionally grateful patients.

And you will hear from patients whose experiences with physicians and the healthcare system range from sublime to horrendous.

You may not like or agree with some of the things you read there-I often don’t and I’m a doctor myself.  That’s part of the point of this blog. We physicians are not homogeneous. We are individuals with different stories to tell from differing points of view, based on background, training,  and experience.

The blog is divided into sections based on broad categories of topics –

physician, patient, policy, tech, social media , meds, conditions.

Some of the articles are directed to patients while others are physician oriented. I encourage you to read some of both, in addition to the ones I am sharing here.

Many of the physician authors write their own blogs, so it is a good place to explore and discover other health bloggers that you may enjoy.

How doctors feel about relationships with patients-

Dr. Jennifer Lycette , an oncologist who blogs at The Hopeful Cancer Doc, offered her take on a situation that I have encountered more than once myself.

Don’t call me “Mrs.” Call me “Doctor.”

“To address a female physician as “Mrs.,” even if she is married, is to imply that despite all her professional accomplishments, her worth is reduced to her marital status. It ignores all the hard work that went into earning the title of “Doctor,” and denotes, whether intentional or not, that a female physician is somehow less deserving of the title than a male physician.”Dr. Oglesby nametag

How patients feel about communicating with doctors

Martine Ehrenclou is a patient advocate.

 

 

 

 

She is the author of Critical Conditions: The Essential Hospital Guide to Get Your Loved One Out Alive and The Take-Charge Patient.

She submitted an interesting piece on a controversial topic, that of patients recording their visits with doctors, either with or without permission.

“patients are in fact secretly recording conversations with their doctors without asking permission first.

Talk about a blow to the doctor-patient relationship.

I understand the hesitation to ask permission to record an office or hospital visit with a medical provider as I experienced it myself. But secretly recording is a violation of trust. Why would any patient surreptitiously tamper with the relationship with their doctor, something that is considered the cornerstone of quality care?’

Documenting information your doctor gives you is essential because it’s just too easy to misunderstand or forget the medical information conveyed. “

She offers these

Tips to remember what the doctor tells you.

How doctors think about treating illness

Dr. Eileen Sprys is a family physician who wants you to know

When you have a cold, why I’m not giving you an antibiotic

“I want you to know that as a physician, I feel a pang of insecurity, guilt, and sadness when a patient tells me they’re upset because I won’t write an antibiotic.  I don’t want you to be sick or miserable.

I understand how inconvenient and sometimes life altering a cold can be. I desperately, desperately wish that I had a cure for your cold, but none of us do.

I also want you to know that for every antibiotic I over-prescribe, that I run the unnecessary risk of making someone even more sick, even to the point of hospitalization or death. I went into medicine to help you and to relieve your suffering with integrity — and that by giving you antibiotics without indication, I am betraying my own purpose.”

six-facts-graphic

What doctors want you to know but don’t have time to tell you

a vision refractor

An ophthalmologist is a physician (doctor of medicine, MD, or doctor of osteopathy, DO) who specializes in the medical and surgical care of the eyes and visual system and in the prevention of eye disease and injury.

Dr. Brian C. Joondeph is an ophthalmologist and can be reached on Twitter @retinaldoctor. This article originally in the HealthZette reveals

8 things doctors secretly want to tell their patients

Number 8 is “I’m only human.”

 “We have our good days and bad days just like anyone else. We try to always have a smile on our faces, be upbeat and cheerful. But we, too, are affected by life’s challenges — work, family, finances, health, and so on. Don’t be too quick to judge and criticize!”

What doctors do away from their practice

KevinMD does have a few photos, and even some videos. I enjoyed this one by physician-comedian Brad Nieder, MD who blogs  at the The Healthy Humorist.

In this clip he explains how he learned to eat less.

After you explore KevinMD, please come back and leave a comment about a post you especially liked, learned something from, or maybe disagreed with.

 

 

 

 

Please share this post and  follow this blog and explore the HEART of health with me. Thanks for your time.

Dr. Aletha 

The word "Read" written in black paint on a colorful watercolor washed background.

What Patients Say, What Doctors Hear- a book review

What Patients Say, What Doctors Hear

by Danielle Ofri, M.D. , an associate professor of medicine at the New York University School of Medicine and staff physician at New York’s Bellevue Hospital .  The book is published by Beacon Press

“What patients say and what doctors hear can be two very dissimilar things. The reverse is also quite true: what doctors say and what patients hear can be radically different.”

“For all of the sophisticated diagnostic tools of modern medicine, the conversation between doctor and patient remains the primary diagnostic tool. Even in fields that are visual (dermatology) or procedural(surgery), the patient’s verbal description of the problem and the doctor’s questions about it are critical to an accurate diagnosis.”

What Patients Say, What Doctors Hear- a book cover

written by Danielle Ofri, M.D.

I am so convinced of the truth of these two statements, that I have written several blog posts about physician-patient communication. So when I learned of a book that delves into this subject in detail, I knew I needed to read it; I was not disappointed.

As a physician, this was not an easy book to read; Dr. Ofri does not hesitate to tell us physicians what we need to do better in our communication with our patients.

But she also makes it plain to patients that you have a role and a vested stake in communicating your concerns, questions, and even grievances to the physicians who care for you; that without such information, your physicians cannot provide optimal diagnosis and treatment for you.

doctor talking to a woman

photo compliments American Academy of Family Physicians

Dr. Ofri bases her conclusions on her own encounters with patients over 20+ years of practice, interviews with other doctors and patients, and published research on communication. In her book she explains

  • How the uniqueness and complexity of the physician-patient relationship impacts their communication
  • Why patients’ less satisfactory encounters with the medical system are often due to poor communication, rather than lack of caring and competence, but can lead to lawsuits
  • Why patients’ unfamiliarity of medical terms can hinder communication , and how differences in use of words between doctors and patients, and even between doctors can lead to misunderstanding

For example, Dr. Ofri relates an incident when she was still a medical student working in the hospital and came across the term “expired” to refer to a patient who had died. She had never heard the word used this way. Then years later, when she was an attending physician, she was confused when an intern from a southern state reported to her that a patient had passed during the previous night. Passed what?, she thought. In some areas of our country,  “passed” is commonly used to mean someone has died, but Dr. Ofri had never heard this.

woman-sitting-in-front-of-a-tree-in-a-cemetery-grieving

photo from Lightstock.com, affiliate link

Dr. Ofri discusses the placebo effect of medicines and treatments, and how expectations affect response to treatment. (The placebo effect means responding to  a treatment that contains no active medical substance.  Interestingly, placebo treatments “work”.)

She details the many reasons patients have difficulty adhering to doctors’ recommended treatment plans, such as cost, inconvenience, distance, and other factors unrelated to not understanding the seriousness of their condition, as one might suppose.

I was intrigued by the story of a hospital in The Netherlands which hired a woman to be the “Chief Listening Officer.” Her only duty was to listen to patients talk about their complaints or grievances  about their care, not to fix or solve problems, but just to listen. And it was successful; once patients felt they had been heard, they had no desire to pursue legal action and felt more satisfied with their care.

She also relates a program called Sorry Works!, a way to handle medical errors with mediation rather than lawsuits, also a successful program.

Dr. Aletha talking to a mother and her son

Talking to a patient through an interpreter makes communication extra challenging. (photo from a volunteer medical trip to Ecuador)

What Patients Say, What Doctors Hear  helps  patients understand the complexity of what physicians do in our encounters with patients and how that impacts our subsequent decision making and treatment decisions.

This book illustrates there are multiple detailed steps between

  • A patient’s problem and the best solution
  • The patient’s and family’s questions and the correct answers
  • The final (or sometimes current) diagnosis and the definitive,  best available ,or least toxic treatment.

“The biggest take-home message…is that both doctors and patients need to give communication its just due. Rather than ..the utilitarian humdrum of a visit, the conversation should be viewed as the single most important tool of medical care…a highly sophisticated technology.

The mere act of both parties taking this conversation more seriously will enhance communication and improve medical care. …effective communication needn’t take a long time, it just needs full and intense focus…and can yield an abundance of information.”

In this previous blog post I offer suggestions on physician-patient communication based on my years in practice:

Do you know the best questions to ask about your healthcare?

You know it’s important to tell us details of your symptoms, medical history, family history, habits, and other medical facts.   But besides medical information about you , we need to know

Your expectations about your care,

Your concerns about your care,

Your obstacles to getting care,

Watercress Words on Facebook

 

Watercress Words is on Facebook where I post additional content to explore the heart of health just like I do here- posts to inform, instruct and inspire you . If you haven’t visited me there, please do.

Here are a few of my recent Facebook posts.

Do you qualify to donate blood?

This article from the New York Times health blog explains who can and can’t donate blood.  If you meet the qualifications, consider donating in your community. You may help save a life.

Too Old to Donate Blood? Maybe not.

person donating blood

photo compliments of Pixabay

Wednesday Word is where I define and discuss a medical term , like this one.

endemic- natural to or characteristic of a particular people or place

Medically speaking, an endemic disease occurs in a particular place or a particular population; for example, malaria is endemic to tropical areas; malnutrition is endemic to people suffering from famine.

Related words are

epidemic– a sudden severe outbreak of a disease in a particular location or group , such as influenza epidemics.

pandemic– an epidemic becomes wide spread, across countries and continents

Are you looking for a new doctor?

This article offers sound advice on finding and choosing a physician, and  how to prepare for your first visit.

Thanks to Nurse Beth at her blog Boomer Highway.

You’re A Candidate For

Good Health & A Good Doc

Dr. Oglesby nametag

How much do you know about your doctor’s training and experience? Make sure you choose a doctor for the right reasons.

I share humorous medical cartoons on  Friday Funny.

I am particularly fond of the antics of the organ characters from The Awkward Yeti.

( note this is an affiliate link)

And  inspiration from some fun-loving, dancing nurses.

Shared from InspireMore.

How to talk to your doctor to improve your medical care

For you to receive correct and effective medical treatment , your doctors need the right medical information.

I’ve written about doctor-patient communication before, because  it’s the most important part of the encounter. No amount of lab tests, scans,or  invasive procedures substitutes for the information we get from patients.

You may think doctors make a diagnosis based on lab tests or xrays. But much of the time, those tests only confirm what we already suspect  based on your symptoms. If we misunderstand what you describe, or fail to get complete information we may  start testing for something far removed from what is wrong with you.

 

Wrong information > wrong working diagnosis>wrong testing>wrong final diagnosis  

taking blood pressure

 

 

 

Doctors are learning how to communicate better with patients. One key is using “plain language” rather than medical jargon. However, even plain language can be misunderstood. And with a plethora of medical information online patients know and use medical terms too. Communication between doctors and patients may never be perfect, but we can do better.

 

2 medical people talking to a patient

a patient encounter in a rural clinic in Panama

 

 

 

Here are some tips on talking to your doctor .

There are always exceptions. Doctors have different communication styles, and may interact differently than what I’m suggesting here. These are general guidelines.

 

 

GET TO THE POINT

Be clear and specific about why you are there; don’t expect your doctor to uncover a hidden objective.

Sometimes we can read between the lines and suspect you didn’t come because of a mole that hasn’t changed in 10 years. So if you’re there because you’ve been having chest pain and you’re worried it’s your heart, say so . Then we have time to give your concern the time it deserves .

GIVE DETAIL

All coughs are not created equal. Knowing  your  cough started yesterday  rather than  6 months  ago helps me determine the more likely cause.

 Tell your doctor how long, how often, how severe, what helps, what worsens, your symptoms; that helps to narrow the possible causes. 

This post will explain

How to tell your doctor what’s wrong with you. 

 

STAY ON POINT

Finish talking about your cough before starting to talk about the pain in your back.

A string of symptoms without detail is confusing and doesn’t give me enough information  to evaluate any of them.

BE HONEST ABOUT YOUR MEDICAL HISTORY AND LIFESTYLE

Sometimes patients leave out important information due to forgetting, thinking it’s not important, embarrassment, or fear. But that may be the very piece of data I need to pinpoint what’s wrong.

So tell the doctor

  • If you can’t do something you’re asked  to do,
  • if you can’t afford the medication,
  • if your insurance doesn’t cover something,
  • if you are afraid to go for the test 
  • if you are seeing other doctors for anything,
  • how much you smoke,drink, or other habits

 

TALK BACK

Ask questions if you don’t understand something.

If you don’t, I may assume you do understand. Ask me to review what I  told you. Put it in your own words and ask me if that’s what I meant.

BE SPECIFIC

Patients may use words or terms they assume I understand, but may mean something different to us.

“Heart attack” often means something different to patients than to doctors.

( Patients may use it to refer to any sudden heart problem, while doctors understand it to mean a specific event called a myocardial infarction.)

diagram of the human heart

 

 

In general, avoid using diagnostic terms. Instead of saying, “I have a sinus infection.”, we need to hear “My nose is stuffed up, I’m sneezing, and my throat is scratchy.”

 

Some words your doctor may ask you to clarify-

 

  • Dizzy- do you mean off balance or spinning?
  • Tired- do you mean fatigued or sleepy?
  • Difficulty focusing – do you mean vision focus or mental focus?
  • Weak- do you lack  energy or lack strength?
  • “I’ve tried everything.”- Tell me what “everything” is.

 

If you have  received a specific diagnosis from a doctor, it’s helpful for us to know that; we may want to confirm it with appropriate questions, exam, review of your records, and possibly additional testing.

 

Read about Understanding medical terms and asking questions 

 

And I share medical terms and their meanings at  Watercress Words on Facebook

 

 

TELL ME WHAT WENT WRONG

I know this one is tricky; you don’t want to offend me, maybe you’re afraid you won’t get good care if you complain. But I can’t fix problems if I don’t know about them.

If my care or care from my staff is unsatisfactory, please tell me. If you offer constructive criticism about specific problems, we can work together to solve them. And if it’s not something I can or will change, I will explain. 

 

Learn to handle conflict here Why patients sue their doctors 

 

 

doctor holding a patient's hand

Courtesy and kindness should be part of every medical encounter.

 

 

Talking to your doctor should be comfortable and therapeutic. Remember

It’s confidential,

It’s all about you,

It’s not a surprise to your doctor- we’ve heard just about everything before

 

 

Over the Moon Link Party- featured Blogger

This post was featured at Over the Moon Link Party

 

a medical person holding a stethoscope

Why patients sue their doctors

 

 

“6 reasons to sue your doctor and how not to”

was the original title of a series of posts I wrote soon after starting this blog. Later the posts were called

 “Stopping medical malpractice- how patients can help”

 

The main point of the series ,the relationship between patients and physicians, prompted me to start this blog. Too often doctors and patients become adversaries rather than partners, and this series addresses that.

You will find  links to all four articles in the series here, with a brief excerpt from each one. They have also been slightly revised and updated.

Part 1

In the March 2015 issue of Medical Economics, attorney Richard Baker wrote,  “Being sued for malpractice, especially for the first time, can be an unsettling and frustrating experience for a physician.”    And stressful and unsettling for a patient, or patient’s family .

A medical malpractice lawsuit follows an adverse medical outcome –

  • a missed or inaccurate diagnosis,
  • an ineffective or harmful treatment,
  • a surgery gone bad,
  • an outcome that left permanent harm or at worst, death.

Patients become  upset and often angry, and may assume that malpractice has occurred. They want to hold the doctor responsible , and want compensation for medical expenses, lost income, pain and suffering.

I don’t understand all the legal aspects of medical liability. But an unsatisfactory outcome may not mean poor care ;  illness or injury can be so severe  that any treatment is ineffective.  Or  there were multiple possible treatment options so the physician  made a judgement call that proved less than ideal.

But  it may reflect some behavior on the part of the doctor, another healthcare professional, or even the patient that could have been avoided.

continued here

Dr. Aletha treating a child

 

 

 

Part 2

No matter how careful hiring policies are , incompetent, unscrupulous and dishonest employees get into the healthcare system undetected. This is  bad for any industry, but in healthcare is  dangerous and even deadly.

If you notice something out of line in a medical office or hospital, or if the care is not as expected, don’t hesitate to report it to someone in authority. You can do this anonymously, although the more specific information you provide, the more likely the situation can be corrected .Even if nothing proves to be wrong, it will  give them helpful feedback about their service.

continued here

Dr. Aletha examining an infant

 

 

 

Part 3

You can’t control  your doctor’s training, CME (continuing medical education), and certifications. But you have a right and responsibility to confirm that the doctor is qualified to perform the services offered. Doctors’ offices have diplomas, licenses, awards displayed on the walls for a reason-they want you to look at them.  Hospitals and other health care facilities confirm  that  the  physicians who work there have the appropriate credentials.

continued here

 

Dr. Aletha with a health worker in Central America

Here I am with a health worker at a rural clinic in Central America. We held a medical outreach with a volunteer team.

 

 

 

Conclusion

The best way for physicians and patients to work through their feelings about a bad outcome is to start out with a mutually respectful, cooperative relationship.

Just like any other relationship, there may be times of disagreement; but these can and should be resolved with each satisfied that their viewpoint has been listened to , understood, and respected

continued here  

 

Dr. Aletha talking to a mother and her son

 

(Photos are from volunteer medical trips to Mexico, Panama, Ecuador and VietNam )

 

 

Dr. Danielle Ofri , author of several books about practicing medicine and patient relationships, considers effective doctor-patient communication crucial to successful medical outcomes. I reviewed her book here

What Patients Say, What Doctors Hear- a book review

What Patients Say, What Doctors Hear by Danielle Ofri, MD- a book

 

 

3 keys to effective communication with your doctor, part 2

In part 1, we considered the importance of establishing a connection between doctors and patients before trying to communicate. The goal is to establish effective patient engagement. (if you haven’t read part 1, I suggest reading it now, this post will make more sense if you do)

Now we’re going to look at some practical aspects of exchanging information with doctors- remember, exchange means give something and receive something  in return. 

Doctors want to give patients the information they need and most of the time believe they have done so. We are surprised when patients come back and say we didn’t explain their problem and its treatment, or they didn’t understand what we told them about it. I think this happens for 2 reasons.

  • We doctors tell patients what we think is important, but it may not be what you the patient or family considers most important.
  • After patients hear part of what we say, they get saturated and don’t hear the rest, especially when it is emotionally charged.

 

That’s why it is so important for patients and families to ask questions; don’t just rely on what the doctors volunteer. What is important to them may not be what is most important to you. And the more specific questions you ask, the more detailed the information you receive will be.

The one question you should always ask a doctor at each visit is

“What is the most important problem today, and what is the next step in treating it?”

The most important problem that the doctor finds may not be the one you were admitted for or came to the office for. Or if you came with multiple problems, the most important may not be the one that seemed most urgent to you.

For example, you may go to an emergency facility for an injury that caused a large gash on your leg, one that needs stitches. This is an urgent problem that needs to be treated. But the doctor finds that you have high blood pressure that you are unaware of. High blood pressure can lead to heart failure and stroke  if left untreated. So the doctor is going to instruct you to see your primary care doctor to have this problem addressed. In terms of your long term health, the high blood pressure is your most important problem today.

 

It is important to control blood pressure

High blood pressure can cause a heart attack.

 

You will get more helpful information from your doctor if your questions are as specific as you can ask; always inquire as to how tests and procedures this will affect your treatment and recovery. Here are some examples-

  • What did the xray show and what does mean for my problem?
  • What was blood test result and will it change my treatment?
  • How will this procedure change my condition?
  • What needs to happen before he can move out of ICU?

 

Write important things down. Questions that you want to ask. Information that the doctors need. Answers to the questions. Refer to it each time you speak with the doctors.

 

When you or a loved one is in the hospital, your main concern is going home. When the time comes to be discharged, it is just as important to ask questions and understand the plan as during the illness. Too many times I have had patients return to my office after a hospital stay  unable to give me any information about their illness and care . Important information to know include

  • What problems were treated during this admission and how did they change?
  • What will we need to do at home to continue the recovery?
  • When do we need to see a doctor and which doctor do we see?
  • What medications will I need to be on when I go home?

 

Understanding your doctor– medical jargon may not be the problem

Doctors are being encouraged and taught to use “plain language” when talking to patients, meaning limiting the use of medical jargon. I agree that a string of highly technical terms of any kind makes communication harder. But I’m not sure that simply using plain words solves the problem either. Whatever terms you use to exchange information must be understood by both persons. And that is not always the case.

Here’s an example.

If a doctor says that you or a relative has had a Myocardial infarction , do you know that that means a Heart attack? 

But, do you know exactly what heart attack means? Probably not.

 

What causes heart disease?

A heart attack means the heart muscle is injured from too little oxygen reaching it, usually due to blockage in the arteries.

 

 

So,  if the doctor says “heart attack” without adding any additional information, you should ask

  • “I understand a heart attack to mean ________. Is this correct?”
  • “I do not understand what a heart attack is. Please explain.”

 

You can master medical  terminology . How many new things have you learned in the past 5 years? Each of those had a vocabulary and instructions that you learned and now use regularly. Think of your first smartphone, tablet, digital camera or even a coffee maker . You make the effort to learn what is important to you . 

Make an attempt to learn about your and your family’s medical issues; even if you don’t understand it completely your doctor will appreciate that you are trying.

In addition to  doctors you have nurses, pharmacists, dieticians, physical therapists, social workers who can answer questions. Ask for referrals to community resources.

There are helpful resources on the Internet so anyone with a laptop, tablet, or smartphone has access to medical information anywhere anytime.

Sometimes it is helpful to find accurate definitions of medical terms. Consider using the

Plain Language Dictionary from the University of Michigan

The dictionary is also offered as a free app on iTunes for iPhone and iPad .

Another source from the CDC is Plain Language Thesaurus for Health Communications-available to download as a  Word document or PDF versions

 

 

Understanding Medical Words: A Tutorial from the National Library of Medicine will help you understand where medical terms come from and how to interpret terms that are new to you. There’s even a test at the end to see how much you learned. Comment and let me know how you do.

 

rhinoceros

It’s easy to remember that “rhino” refers to the nose, as in rhinosinusitis.

Also on this topic, my previous  post How to tell your doctor what’s wrong with you