Tag Archives: literature

The word "Read" written in black paint on a colorful watercolor washed background.

Will reading about health make you healthier?

Did you know that reading books can help you be more creative, more successful, and add years to your life? Well, it can, according to this article

Why reading books should be your priority, according to science

I chose several book sites as affiliates for this blog- because I like to read, I believe reading is important, and I hope my readers do also. Even though I write for the internet, I think books and other printed media are valuable.

 

I have reviewed several books for this blog but in this post I share some others that I have heard of and think sound worthy of considering. I haven’t read them yet, but if you have or do read them, please write me and tell me what you think. I’ll share it with my other readers (anonymously if you prefer).

Will reading about health make you healthier? watercresswords.com

 

 

These book links are affiliate links- but if you want to borrow them from your local library that’s fine, I borrow books also. If you do make a purchase, you will be supporting the work of this blog- to spread the HEART of health throughout the world. Thank you!


The China Study: The Most Comprehensive Study of Nutrition Ever Conducted And the Startling Implications for Diet, Weight Loss, And Long-term Health 

by  T. Colin Campbell, PH.D and Thomas Campbell, M.D.

The science is clear. The results are unmistakable.

You can dramatically reduce your risk of cancer, heart disease, and diabetes just by changing your diet.

More than thirty years ago, nutrition researcher T. Colin Campbell and his team at Cornell, in partnership with teams in China and England, embarked upon the China Study, the most comprehensive study ever undertaken of the relationship between diet and the risk of developing disease. What they found when combined with findings in Colin’s laboratory, opened their eyes to the dangers of a diet high in animal protein and the unparalleled health benefits of a whole foods, plant-based diet.

In 2005, Colin and his son Tom, now a physician, shared those findings with the world in The China Study, hailed as one of the most important books about diet and health ever written.

Featuring brand new content, this heavily expanded edition of Colin and Tom’s groundbreaking book includes the latest undeniable evidence of the power of a plant-based diet, plus updated information about the changing medical system and how patients stand to benefit from a surging interest in plant-based nutrition.


Bestsellers at eBooks.com!

Support Independent Bookstores - Visit IndieBound.org

First ,Do No Harm: The Dramatic Story of Real Doctors and Patients Making Impossible Choices at a Big-City Hospital

by Lisa Belkin

“A powerful, true story of life and death in a major metropolitan hospital…Harrowing… An important book.”
THE NEW YORK TIMES

“What is life worth? And what is a life worth living?

At a time when America faces vital choices about the future of its health care, former NEW YORK TIMES correspondent Lisa Belkin takes a powerful and poignant look at the inner workings of Hermann Hospital in Houston, Texas, telling the remarkable, real-life stories of the doctors, patients, families, and hospital administrators who must ask–and ultimately answer–the most profound and heart-rending questions about life and death.”

Fat Girl Walking: Sex, Food, Love, and Being Comfortable in your Skin…every Inch of It

by  Brittany Gibbons

Support Independent Bookstores - Visit IndieBound.org

“Fat Girl Walking isn’t a diet book. It isn’t one of those former fat people memoirs about how someone battled, and won, in the fight against fat.

Brittany doesn’t lose all the weight and reveal the happy, skinny girl that’s been hiding inside her. Instead, she reminds us that being chubby doesn’t mean you’ll end up alone, unhappy, or the subject of a cable medical show. What’s important is learning to love your shape.

With her infectious humor and soul-baring honesty, Fat Girl Walking reveals a life full of the same heartbreak, joy, oddity, awkwardness, and wonder as anyone else’s. Just with better snacks.”

 Read it on iBooks

“Dr. Bessel van der Kolk, one of the world’s foremost experts on trauma, has spent over three decades working with survivors.

In The Body Keeps the Score, he uses recent scientific advances to show how trauma literally reshapes both body and brain, compromising sufferers’ capacities for pleasure, engagement, self-control, and trust.

He explores innovative treatments—from neurofeedback and meditation to sports, drama, and yoga—that offer new paths to recovery by activating the brain’s natural neuroplasticity. Based on Dr. van der Kolk’s own research and that of other leading specialists, The Body Keeps the Score exposes the tremendous power of our relationships both to hurt and to heal—and offers new hope for reclaiming lives.”

In case you missed it, here is my guest post about how reading changed my life.

How have books changed yours?

Reading-The Fastest Way to Everywhere

 

 

Kindle Unlimited Membership Plans

 

 

 

 

 

Thanks for reading Watercress Words. Please share, follow, and support this blog  as we explore the HEART of Health together. 

                                     Dr. Aletha 

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Light it up blue-autism speaks

Most viewed post #2- Why I have “A Different Way of Seeing Autism”- a book review

I write little about my personal life on this blog, but this post is an exception. I  write book reviews frequently, and this post is one of those.

The book is important to me for both personal and professional reasons, so it seemed a good choice to write about.  I am pleased that it made the top 5 this year.

Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a neurological and developmental disorder that begins early in childhood and lasts throughout a person’s life. It affects how a person acts and interacts with others, communicates, and learns. It includes what used to be known as Asperger syndrome and pervasive developmental disorders.  Due to changes in diagnostic criteria, lack of definitive tests, overlapping symptoms, and missed diagnoses it’s hard to say what the most common developmental disorder is, but autism likely falls within the top 5.

In this post I explained why I have “a different way of seeing autism.”

 

As soon as I started reading Uniquely Human: A Different Way of Seeing Autism, I knew I had found answers to many of my questions and ,more importantly ,fears about autism. The structure of the book parallels my journey with autism.

 

Part 1- understanding autism:

For the majority of my adult life I have understood autism as a physician, which means I understood little. My training and experience as a family physician taught me  the basics of autism, but  little of the treatment and of the condition. My few autistic patients went to    developmental pediatricians , neurologists, psychiatrists,or psychologists so my involvement was  limited to their physical needs.

From my limited exposure to autistic persons, I saw autism as a life altering, disabling , untreatable  condition that disrupted families as they struggled to cope and manage.

a banner reading "aok Walk for Autism

Part 2- living with autism:

My autism understanding and experience changed when I began living with autism- that is, when my 3-year-old grandson was diagnosed as autistic. At 2 years old he was not using words, even though he had been just a few months before. Other changes in his behavior concerned and alarmed me- lack of eye contact, withdrawing from me and his grandfather, ignoring what was happening around him.

Our once happy, friendly baby grandson seemed to disappear.

a cute baby boy

A happy, smiling, social baby boy, before things changed

 

 

I remember the day I sat at my computer searching the internet for “speech delay in toddlers”. The first, as well as the next several references, all returned the same words – “autism spectrum disorders.”

I cried the first of many tears imagining what the future held for our little family.

 

 

toddler

At age 2 years, we all sensed something had changed. Evaluations and therapy soon followed.

 

 

 

 

I started reading books, medical journal articles and autism focus web sites, trying to find something hopeful and helpful to bring to my family’s autism journey. In Uniquely Human I found that help and hope.

 

UNIQUELY HUMAN- A DIFFERENT WAY OF SEEING AUTISM

UNIQUELY HUMAN- A DIFFERENT WAY OF SEEING AUTISM

 

 

 

 

 

Uniquely Human was written by Barry Prizant, Ph.D.

Uniquely Human was published by Simon and Schuster.

According to his official Facebook page, Dr. Prizant is recognized internationally as a scholar in autism spectrum disorders and childhood disabilities.

He is an Adjunct Professor, Brown University, & Director, Childhood Communication Services.

His many honors include

2014 Honors of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association,

2005 Princeton University-Eden Career Award in autism

2013 Divine Neurotypical Award of GRASP.

 

He is married to Dr. Elaine Meyer, an Associate Professor and Director, Center for Professionalism and Ethical Practice in the Harvard Medical School and father of teenage son Noah, a student at Washington University in St. Louis.

In his spare time, Barry plays drums in a rock/blues band, enjoys hiking, fishing and outdoor activities, and is an avid collector of Inuit, Native American and other indigenous art, and antiques.

In his book, Uniquely Human, Dr. Prizant approaches autism from a perspective gained from studying about and treating children with autism for 40 years.

He approaches autism more “how to” rather than “what or why”. He recommends working with the child’s strengths rather than trying to change or cure their weakness.

Much of the “treatment” of autism centers on controlling so-called autistic behaviors. He believes that these behaviors are the way autistic children cope with the challenges of “sensory dysregulation.” We should address the triggers of this dysregulation rather than trying to manipulate the behavior, he says.

 

 

“The central challenge of autism is a disability of trust

Trusting their body

Trusting the world

Trusting other people.”

 

 “The best way to help them (autistic children) progress toward fulfilling meaningful lives is

Find ways to engage them

Build a sense of self

Foster joyful experiences”

 

In his book, Dr. Prizant outlines  ways to help autistic people . From my family’s experience, we have learned the importance of almost all of them.  I list them here, along with some of my personal observations.

little boy walking with mother, holding hands

participating in our community Walk for Autism event

 

 

 

“Welcome them  into your world”

Include them in family and social activities to whatever extent they can and will participate.

 

little boy with Easter basket full of eggs

Success at an Easter egg hunt.

 

 

 

 

 

“Don’t label them – high-functioning  vs low -functioning”

I was pleased to read that Dr. Prizant’s does not use those terms. As he says,

“People are infinitely complex and development is multidimensional and cannot be reduced to such a simple dichotomy. “

He goes on to call these labels “terribly inaccurate and misleading ” and that using them is “disrespectful.” The label low-functioning can become a self-fulfilling prophesy.

He concludes,

“Instead of focusing on vague and imprecise labels, it’s better to focus on the child’s relative strengths and challenges, and to identify the most beneficial supports. “

 

He discusses this in more detail in this article from 2012.

A False (Harmful?) Dichotomy 

 

“Engage them; try to communicate”

Not all autistic people are verbal; but they all communicate in some way. We just need to understand how and work with that

2016-09-28-18-50-18

exercising with the video game

 

 

 

“Give choices”

“Treat respectfully, with empathy and  sensitivity”

“Meltdowns are a common occurrence with autism but are not “temper tantrums”. They usually reflect a need or want that isn’t being met, or a situation that is overwhelming or too stimulating.  We try to adjust the circumstances to his feelings, not force him into something that is uncomfortable for him.

 

little boy wearing sunglasses

Check out those shades; being silly helps sometimes.

 

 

 

 

“Humor”

Sometimes you just need to laugh.

 

children in Halloween masks

searching for the perfect Halloween mask with his older sister

 

 

 

“Offer to help but no unsolicited advice or criticism”

I ask a lot of  questions. Whenever I meet someone who has an autistic child or relative, a  special education teacher  or therapist of  developmentally challenged persons , I try to learn something from them. Friends occasionally offer  advice about a therapy or some facility that I often already know about. As long as it is offered non-judgmentally I appreciate their interest. So far I’ve never had anyone overtly criticise.

“Be positive; use tenderness with your honesty.”

 

little boy with a big camera

eager to try new things

 

 

 

 

 

“Celebrate with us”

Don’t be afraid to ask how things are going, as long as you don’t mind sometimes hearing the bad as well as the good.

 

girl and boy in a corn field

exploring the corn maze with sister

 

 

 

 

“Trust- be dependable, clear and concrete”

man and boy on the floor

Rough-housing with grandpa

 

 

 

 

 

 

I am happy to say my grandson is doing well. He benefits from speech and occupational therapy, special education in the public school, and the prayers and support from our friends and family, especially his parents and sister.

I  see him and every other person with autism as “Uniquely Human” ; knowing and loving him has changed my life in  ways I could not have imagined and would not want to miss.

Learn What motivated Dr. Prizant to write Uniquely Human

in this interview by autism specialist Becca Lory

THE SPARK- A Mother’s Story of Nurturing, Genius, and Autism

Another book that encouraged me is THE SPARK  by Kristine Barnett. When her son Jake was diagnosed with autism at 2 years old, doctors told her he would never attend school for “normal’ children. Undeterred, she taught him herself, building on his strengths. By 16, he was attending college- and helping to teach classes in quantum physics.

I don’t know if Mrs. Barnett knew of Dr. Prizant’s methods, but it certainly sounds as if she used them. Or maybe she just followed her motherly instincts. Here’s how she says it in the introduction.

“This book is the story of how we got from there to here, the story of a mother’s journey with her remarkable son…it is about the power of hope and the dazzling possibilities that can occur when we keep our minds open and learn how to tap the true potential that lies within every child. “

I highly recommend this book to anyone who needs or wants to know more about autism.

 

 

 

Please share with your friends and join me  for the year’s  most viewed post. 

Follow Watercress Words as we explore the HEART of HEALTH. 

Thanks for being here with me. I appreciate your interest. 

Dr.Aletha 

 

 

Light it up blue-autism speaks

Why I observe Autism Awareness Day

Every year  people around the world observe April 2 as World Autism Awareness Day (WAAD) and April as World Autism Awareness Month. What’s it all about? Why observe such a day?

World Autism Awareness Day, established in 2007,  is one of only three official health related United Nations Days.

The purpose of Autism Awareness is

  • to  bring the world’s attention to autism, a pervasive disorder that affects tens of millions.
  • to raise awareness about autism throughout society and
  • to encourage early diagnosis and early intervention. 
     

Autism is a brain disorder that often makes it hard to communicate with and relate to others. With autism, the different areas of the brain fail to work together.”

 

As a physician, I am  professionally aware of  the symptoms of  autism. As the grandmother of a child with autism, I have become intimately and personally aware of what it means to experience life with autism.  A few months ago I reviewed two books  that gave me much needed information  and hope about autism. I believe they will help other autism families and anyone who wants to know more about this condition.

So in observance of World Autism Day I am repeating that post for you now.

 

Uniquely Human: A Different Way of Seeing Autism 

As soon as I started reading Uniquely Human: A Different Way of Seeing Autism, I knew I had found answers to many of my questions and ,more importantly ,fears about autism. The structure of the book parallels my journey with autism.

 

Part 1- understanding autism:

For the majority of my adult life I have understood autism as a physician, which means I understood little. My training and experience as a family physician taught me  the basics of autism, but  little of the treatment and of the condition. My few autistic patients went to    developmental pediatricians , neurologists, psychiatrists,or psychologists so my involvement was  limited to their physical needs.

From my limited exposure to autistic persons, I saw autism as a life altering, disabling , untreatable  condition that disrupted families as they struggled to cope and manage.

Part 2- living with autism:

My autism understanding and experience changed when I began living with autism- that is, when my 3-year-old grandson was diagnosed as autistic. At 2 years old he was not using words, even though he had been just a few months before. Other changes in his behavior concerned and alarmed me- lack of eye contact, withdrawing from me and his grandfather, ignoring what was happening around him.

Our once happy, friendly baby grandson seemed to disappear.

a cute baby boy

A happy, smiling, social baby boy, before things changed

 

 

I remember the day I sat at my computer searching the internet for “speech delay in toddlers”. The first, as well as the next several references, all returned the same words – “autism spectrum disorders.”

I cried the first of many tears imagining what the future held for our little family.

 

 

toddler

At age 2 years, we all sensed something had changed. Evaluations and therapy soon followed.

 

 

 

 

I started reading books, medical journal articles and autism focus web sites, trying to find something hopeful and helpful to bring to my family’s autism journey. In Uniquely Human I found that help and hope.

 

UNIQUELY HUMAN- A DIFFERENT WAY OF SEEING AUTISM

UNIQUELY HUMAN- A DIFFERENT WAY OF SEEING AUTISM

 

 

 

 

 

Uniquely Human was written by Barry Prizant, Ph.D.

Uniquely Human was published by Simon and Schuster.

According to his official Facebook page, Dr. Prizant is recognized internationally as a scholar in autism spectrum disorders and childhood disabilities.

He is an Adjunct Professor, Brown University, & Director, Childhood Communication Services.

His many honors include

2014 Honors of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association,

2005 Princeton University-Eden Career Award in autism

2013 Divine Neurotypical Award of GRASP.

 

He is married to Dr. Elaine Meyer, an Associate Professor and Director, Center for Professionalism and Ethical Practice in the Harvard Medical School and father of teenage son Noah, a student at Washington University in St. Louis.

In his spare time, Barry plays drums in a rock/blues band, enjoys hiking, fishing and outdoor activities, and is an avid collector of Inuit, Native American and other indigenous art, and antiques.

In his book, Uniquely Human, Dr. Prizant approaches autism from a perspective gained from studying about and treating children with autism for 40 years.

He approaches autism more “how to” rather than “what or why”. He recommends working with the child’s strengths rather than trying to change or cure their weakness.

Much of the “treatment” of autism centers on controlling so-called autistic behaviors. He believes that these behaviors are the way autistic children cope with the challenges of “sensory dysregulation.” We should address the triggers of this dysregulation rather than trying to manipulate the behavior, he says.

 

 

“The central challenge of autism is a disability of trust

Trusting their body

Trusting the world

Trusting other people.”

 

 “The best way to help them (autistic children) progress toward fulfilling meaningful lives is

Find ways to engage them

Build a sense of self

Foster joyful experiences”

 

In his book, Dr. Prizant outlines  ways to help autistic people . From my family’s experience, we have learned the importance of almost all of them.  I list them here, along with some of my personal observations.

little boy walking with mother, holding hands

participating in our community Walk for Autism event

 

 

 

“Welcome them  into your world”

Include them in family and social activities to whatever extent they can and will participate.

 

little boy with Easter basket full of eggs

Success at an Easter egg hunt.

 

 

 

 

 

“Don’t label them – high-functioning  vs low -functioning”

I was pleased to read that Dr. Prizant’s does not use those terms. As he says,

“People are infinitely complex and development is multidimensional and cannot be reduced to such a simple dichotomy. “

He goes on to call these labels “terribly inaccurate and misleading ” and that using them is “disrespectful.” The label low-functioning can become a self-fulfilling prophesy.

He concludes,

“Instead of focusing on vague and imprecise labels, it’s better to focus on the child’s relative strengths and challenges, and to identify the most beneficial supports. “

 

He discusses this in more detail in this article from 2012.

A False (Harmful?) Dichotomy 

 

“Engage them; try to communicate”

Not all autistic people are verbal; but they all communicate in some way. We just need to understand how and work with that

2016-09-28-18-50-18

exercising with the video game

 

 

 

“Give choices”

“Treat respectfully, with empathy and  sensitivity”

“Meltdowns are a common occurrence with autism but are not “temper tantrums”. They usually reflect a need or want that isn’t being met, or a situation that is overwhelming or too stimulating.  We try to adjust the circumstances to his feelings, not force him into something that is uncomfortable for him.

 

little boy wearing sunglasses

Check out those shades; being silly helps sometimes.

 

 

 

 

“Humor”

Sometimes you just need to laugh.

 

children in Halloween masks

searching for the perfect Halloween mask with his older sister

 

 

 

“Offer to help but no unsolicited advice or criticism”

I ask a lot of  questions. Whenever I meet someone who has an autistic child or relative, a  special education teacher  or therapist of  developmentally challenged persons , I try to learn something from them. Friends occasionally offer  advice about a therapy or some facility that I often already know about. As long as it is offered non-judgmentally I appreciate their interest. So far I’ve never had anyone overtly criticise.

“Be positive; use tenderness with your honesty.”

 

little boy with a big camera

eager to try new things

 

 

 

 

 

“Celebrate with us”

Don’t be afraid to ask how things are going, as long as you don’t mind sometimes hearing the bad as well as the good.

 

girl and boy in a corn field

exploring the corn maze with sister

 

 

 

 

“Trust- be dependable, clear and concrete”

man and boy on the floor

Rough-housing with grandpa

 

 

I am happy to say my grandson is doing well. He benefits from speech and occupational therapy, special education in the public school, and the prayers and  support from our friends and family, especially his parents and sister. I  see him and every other person with autism as “Uniquely Human” ; knowing and loving him has changed my life in  ways I could not have imagined and would not want to miss.

 

THE SPARK- A Mother’s Story of Nurturing, Genius, and Autism

Another book that encouraged me is THE SPARK  by Kristine Barnett. When her son Jake was diagnosed with autism at 2 years old, doctors told her he would never attend school for “normal’ children. Undeterred, she taught him herself, building on his strengths. By 16, he was attending college- and helping to teach classes in quantum physics.

I don’t know if Mrs. Barnett knew of Dr. Prizant’s methods, but it certainly sounds as if she used them. Or maybe she just followed her motherly instincts. Here’s how she says it in the introduction.

“This book is the story of how we got from there to here, the story of a mother’s journey with her remarkable son…it is about the power of hope and the dazzling possibilities that can occur when we keep our minds open and learn how to tap the true potential that lies within every child. “

I highly recommend this book to anyone who needs or wants to know more about autism.

 

 

 

The word AUTISM written in vintage letterpress type

Why I have “A Different Way of Seeing Autism”- a book review

 

 

As soon as I started reading Uniquely Human: A Different Way of Seeing Autism, I knew I had found answers to many of my questions and ,more importantly ,fears about autism. The structure of the book parallels my journey with autism.

 

Part 1- understanding autism:

For the majority of my adult life I have understood autism as a physician, which means I understood little. My training and experience as a family physician taught me  the basics of autism, but  little of the treatment and of the condition. My few autistic patients went to    developmental pediatricians , neurologists, psychiatrists,or psychologists so my involvement was  limited to their physical needs.

From my limited exposure to autistic persons, I saw autism as a life altering, disabling , untreatable  condition that disrupted families as they struggled to cope and manage.

Part 2- living with autism:

My autism understanding and experience changed when I began living with autism- that is, when my 3-year-old grandson was diagnosed as autistic. At 2 years old he was not using words, even though he had been just a few months before. Other changes in his behavior concerned and alarmed me- lack of eye contact, withdrawing from me and his grandfather, ignoring what was happening around him.

Our once happy, friendly baby grandson seemed to disappear.

a cute baby boy

A happy, smiling, social baby boy, before things changed

 

 

I remember the day I sat at my computer searching the internet for “speech delay in toddlers”. The first, as well as the next several references, all returned the same words – “autism spectrum disorders.”

I cried the first of many tears imagining what the future held for our little family.

 

 

toddler

At age 2 years, we all sensed something had changed. Evaluations and therapy soon followed.

 

 

 

 

I started reading books, medical journal articles and autism focus web sites, trying to find something hopeful and helpful to bring to my family’s autism journey. In Uniquely Human I found that help and hope.

 

UNIQUELY HUMAN- A DIFFERENT WAY OF SEEING AUTISM

UNIQUELY HUMAN- A DIFFERENT WAY OF SEEING AUTISM

 

 

 

 

 

Uniquely Human was written by Barry Prizant, Ph.D.

Uniquely Human was published by Simon and Schuster.

According to his official Facebook page, Dr. Prizant is recognized internationally as a scholar in autism spectrum disorders and childhood disabilities.

He is an Adjunct Professor, Brown University, & Director, Childhood Communication Services.

His many honors include

2014 Honors of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association,

2005 Princeton University-Eden Career Award in autism

2013 Divine Neurotypical Award of GRASP.

 

He is married to Dr. Elaine Meyer, an Associate Professor and Director, Center for Professionalism and Ethical Practice in the Harvard Medical School and father of teenage son Noah, a student at Washington University in St. Louis.

In his spare time, Barry plays drums in a rock/blues band, enjoys hiking, fishing and outdoor activities, and is an avid collector of Inuit, Native American and other indigenous art, and antiques.

In his book, Uniquely Human, Dr. Prizant approaches autism from a perspective gained from studying about and treating children with autism for 40 years.

He approaches autism more “how to” rather than “what or why”. He recommends working with the child’s strengths rather than trying to change or cure their weakness.

Much of the “treatment” of autism centers on controlling so-called autistic behaviors. He believes that these behaviors are the way autistic children cope with the challenges of “sensory dysregulation.” We should address the triggers of this dysregulation rather than trying to manipulate the behavior, he says.

 

 

“The central challenge of autism is a disability of trust

Trusting their body

Trusting the world

Trusting other people.”

 

 “The best way to help them (autistic children) progress toward fulfilling meaningful lives is

Find ways to engage them

Build a sense of self

Foster joyful experiences”

 

In his book, Dr. Prizant outlines  ways to help autistic people . From my family’s experience, we have learned the importance of almost all of them.  I list them here, along with some of my personal observations.

little boy walking with mother, holding hands

participating in our community Walk for Autism event

 

 

 

“Welcome them  into your world”

Include them in family and social activities to whatever extent they can and will participate.

 

little boy with Easter basket full of eggs

Success at an Easter egg hunt.

 

 

 

 

 

“Don’t label them – high-functioning  vs low -functioning”

I was pleased to read that Dr. Prizant’s does not use those terms. As he says,

“People are infinitely complex and development is multidimensional and cannot be reduced to such a simple dichotomy. “

He goes on to call these labels “terribly inaccurate and misleading ” and that using them is “disrespectful.” The label low-functioning can become a self-fulfilling prophesy.

He concludes,

“Instead of focusing on vague and imprecise labels, it’s better to focus on the child’s relative strengths and challenges, and to identify the most beneficial supports. “

 

He discusses this in more detail in this article from 2012.

A False (Harmful?) Dichotomy 

 

“Engage them; try to communicate”

Not all autistic people are verbal; but they all communicate in some way. We just need to understand how and work with that

2016-09-28-18-50-18

exercising with the video game

 

 

 

“Give choices”

“Treat respectfully, with empathy and  sensitivity”

“Meltdowns are a common occurrence with autism but are not “temper tantrums”. They usually reflect a need or want that isn’t being met, or a situation that is overwhelming or too stimulating.  We try to adjust the circumstances to his feelings, not force him into something that is uncomfortable for him.

 

little boy wearing sunglasses

Check out those shades; being silly helps sometimes.

 

 

 

 

“Humor”

Sometimes you just need to laugh.

 

children in Halloween masks

searching for the perfect Halloween mask with his older sister

 

 

 

“Offer to help but no unsolicited advice or criticism”

I ask a lot of  questions. Whenever I meet someone who has an autistic child or relative, a  special education teacher  or therapist of  developmentally challenged persons , I try to learn something from them. Friends occasionally offer  advice about a therapy or some facility that I often already know about. As long as it is offered non-judgmentally I appreciate their interest. So far I’ve never had anyone overtly criticise.

“Be positive; use tenderness with your honesty.”

 

little boy with a big camera

eager to try new things

 

 

 

 

 

“Celebrate with us”

Don’t be afraid to ask how things are going, as long as you don’t mind sometimes hearing the bad as well as the good.

 

girl and boy in a corn field

exploring the corn maze with sister

 

 

 

 

“Trust- be dependable, clear and concrete”

man and boy on the floor

Rough-housing with grandpa

 

 

 

 

 

 

I am happy to say my grandson is doing well. He benefits from speech and occupational therapy, special education in the public school, and the prayers and support from our friends and family, especially his parents and sister.

I  see him and every other person with autism as “Uniquely Human” ; knowing and loving him has changed my life in  ways I could not have imagined and would not want to miss.

 

THE SPARK- A Mother’s Story of Nurturing, Genius, and Autism

Another book that encouraged me is THE SPARK  by Kristine Barnett. When her son Jake was diagnosed with autism at 2 years old, doctors told her he would never attend school for “normal’ children. Undeterred, she taught him herself, building on his strengths. By 16, he was attending college- and helping to teach classes in quantum physics.

I don’t know if Mrs. Barnett knew of Dr. Prizant’s methods, but it certainly sounds as if she used them. Or maybe she just followed her motherly instincts. Here’s how she says it in the introduction.

“This book is the story of how we got from there to here, the story of a mother’s journey with her remarkable son…it is about the power of hope and the dazzling possibilities that can occur when we keep our minds open and learn how to tap the true potential that lies within every child. “

I highly recommend this book to anyone who needs or wants to know more about autism.

 

Learn What motivated Dr. Prizant to write Uniquely Human

in this interview by autism specialist Becca Lory

 

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The word "Read" written in black paint on a colorful watercolor washed background.

What are you reading? book suggestions for health and fitness

I like books and reading.  As a child I visited my local library weekly, and I still do.

(several affiliate links are in this post. )

I receive a weekly email newsletter about new books, music, and videos available at my local library. I reserve material and receive a notice when it’s available.  I have shared some of them  here .

 

A Natural Woman, a memoir by singer/songwriter Carole King

Working Stiff, a memoir by medical examiner Dr. Judy Melinek

 

What are you reading?

 

 

Here are some books that  sound interesting.

 

 

 

 

 

The China Study: The Most Comprehensive Study of Nutrition Ever Conducted And the Startling Implications for Diet, Weight Loss, And Long-term Health 

by  T. Colin Campbell, 2006

Referred to as the “Grand Prix of epidemiology” by The New York Times, this study examines more than 350 variables of health and nutrition with surveys from 6,500 adults in more than 2,500 counties across China and Taiwan, and conclusively demonstrates the link between nutrition and heart disease, diabetes, and cancer.

 

HEART HEALTH

 

While revealing that proper nutrition can have a dramatic effect on reducing and reversing these ailments as well as curbing obesity, this text calls into question the practices of many of the current dietary programs, such as the Atkins diet, that are widely popular in the West.

 

Do No Harm

Stories of Life, Death, and Brain Surgery

MRI OF THE BRAIN

an MRI image of the human brain (photo from Pixabay)

by Dr. Henry Marsh, 2015

 

A leading neurosurgeon offers a revealing look into his life and work, discussing the triumphs, disasters, and regrets of a medical practice that carries grave risks and often requires agonizing decisions.

 

 

 

 

 

Sex, Food, Love, and Being Comfortable in your Skin…every Inch of It

by  Brittany Gibbons, 2015

someone standing on a scaleA plus-sized blogger shares anecdotes about her life as a weird, overweight girl growing up in rural Ohio, including stories about dating, relationships, dieting, and finally accepting her curves.

 

 

 

 

Grain of Truth

The Real Case for and Against Wheat and Glutendrawings of wheat stalks

by  Stephen H. Yafa, 2015

Analyzes the current trend against wheat consumption, tracing its role in history and science to share facts about how wheat has been wrongly demonized and holds an important and nutritious role in dietary health

 

 

 

 

Wowbrary is a nonprofit service that sends you free weekly emails featuring your library’s most recent acquisitions.

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Will reading about health make you healthier?

Thanks for joining me to explore the HEART of health.     Dr. Aletha