What women doctors want you to know about healthcare

September is Women in Medicine Month, so in this post I’m introducing you to some women physicians who promote health in creative ways-writing, speaking, coaching, and advocating.

September is Women in Medicine Month, so in this post I’m introducing you to some women physicians who promote health in creative ways-writing, speaking, coaching, and advocating.

At Dr. Momma Says, Dr. Deborah Burton, pediatric ENT surgeon reviews her reasons for recommending vaccination.

“The growing antivaccination (anti-vax) movement has me confused.  I think it is a developed world thing to celebrate where we are, but we forget where we came from.

As an ENT surgeon who has studied and worked in the healthcare field for about 30 years, I have borne witness to the miracles that vaccines have done. There is no question in my mind that vaccines work.” She goes on to describe

MY AUTHENTIC 30 YEAR JOURNEY REVEALING SPECTACULAR WAYS THAT VACCINES WORK

Recommended Child and Adolescent Immunization Schedule
2019 Recommended Vaccinations for children and adolescents

Psychiatrist Dr. Melissa Welby writes

“Anxiety is a treatable condition. Depending on the intensity, some people can get better on their own and others need therapy and/or medications to help with anxiety. Either way, recovering from anxiety is possible! There are great self-help options available to assist with the treatment of anxiety which includes websites, apps, and books on overcoming anxiety.” Find her list at this post-

48 Resources to Overcome Anxiety for Adults and Children

From Charmaine Gregory, M.D., an ER doctor and fitness coach blogs at Fervently Fit with Charmaine with nutrition and fitness tips.

“Trips to the grocery store are almost as crucial as trips to work. We all need to eat. Some people have stress when they try and go in without a plan. Creating a routine is a good step. Following a few helpful hints can make your shopping easier on you.” Read her tips at

Quick Tips for Easier Grocery Shopping

a basket filled with fruits and vegetables
Will you commit to buying, preparing, and eating more fruits and vegetables? image from LIGHTSTOCK.COM, stock photo site, an affiliate

Dr. Aletha Maybank , a pediatrician, served as deputy commissioner for the New York City health department and now is the first chief health equity officer for the American Medical Association. She believes

Good Health Goes Beyond Having a Doctor and Insurance

“Health is created outside of the walls of the doctor’s office and at the hospital. What are patients’ jobs and employment like? The kind of education they have. Income. Their ability to build wealth. All of these are conditions that impact health. “

(And I’m thrilled that Dr. Maybank and I share our first name.)

The Frugal Physician, Dr. D. writes about finances, specifically how to live debt free. Her main audience is other physicians but she offers advice to patients too.

“Take note of the deductible for your plan and whether your employer chips in. High deductible plans can be alluring because of their low cost and the option to enroll in a Health Savings Account (HSA).  But, if you sign up for one of those, make sure you have the cash to spend the deductible during the year. ” Read the other 9 tips at this link-

10 Ways to Maximize your Doctor’s Visit

a woman in white coat with mask over mouth
Know your health history and medications.

Dr. Eileen Sprys is a family physician who wants you to know

When you have a cold, why I’m not giving you an antibiotic

“I want you to know that as a physician, I feel a pang of insecurity, guilt, and sadness when a patient tells me they’re upset because I won’t write an antibiotic.  I don’t want you to be sick or miserable.

I understand how inconvenient and sometimes life altering a cold can be. I desperately, desperately wish that I had a cure for your cold, but none of us do.

I also want you to know that for every antibiotic I over-prescribe, that I run the unnecessary risk of making someone even more sick, even to the point of hospitalization or death. I went into medicine to help you and to relieve your suffering with integrity — and that by giving you antibiotics without indication, I am betraying my own purpose.”

six-facts-graphic

Emergency medicine physician K. Kay Moody, M.D. wants you to know she is not a “provider” (and neither am I).

“Hi, my name is Dr Moody and I’m NOT a “provider.”

.

Here’s why your doctor isn’t your “provider”.

“The term “provider” levels distinctions and implies a uniformity of expertise and knowledge among health care professionals. The term diminishes those distinctions worthy of differentiation such as education, scope and range of ability.

Generic terminology implies an interchangeability of skills that is inappropriate and erroneous, as well as conferring legitimacy on the provision of health services by non-physician providers that are best performed by, or under the supervision of, physicians.”

position of the American Academy of Family Physicians

a nametag reading ALETHA OGLESBY, M.D.

Women physicians are sharing the HEART of health

I appreciate my female colleagues who share their knowledge and experience through writing in addition to caring for patients. I am honored to share their insights here.

I appreciate all of you who follow this blog; there are numerous other blogs to choose from so I am honored you chose to spend some time here. A special welcome to all my new followers from this past month.

Thanks for following this blog. If you’re visiting, I would love for you to start following Watercress Words : use the form to get an email notification of new posts. Don’t worry, you won’t get anything else from me. I also want you to find and follow me on Facebook, Pinterest , Instagram, and LinkedIn .

Dr. Aletha 

Reconsidering vaccination- a book review

So, I was first surprised, then puzzled, then alarmed at the number of parents who reject vaccination for their children, and adults who decline immunizations for themselves. Some people now fear the vaccines more than the diseases they prevent and we physicians must consider this to help people stay well instead of treating them when sick.

This information is current as of the publication date; it is general medical information that helps doctors and patients make decisions about what is right for them. Medical recommendations and practice changes as we learn new things. If you deal with any of these issues , please discuss with your doctor before taking any action.

In 1961,  my mother and I went to my school on a Sunday afternoon to receive the newly released oral polio vaccine. She along with other parents eagerly sought a way to prevent a dreaded disease that had the potential to cripple or even kill their children.

In medical school I learned about diphtheria, a painful throat infection due to a bacteria, Corynebacterium diphtheriae. Once a common cause of severe illness and death, a vaccine had rendered it rare. I saw no cases of diphtheria in medical school, nor have I since.

As a young physician I welcomed the introduction of the H.Flu vaccine (Haemophilus influenzae bacteria, not the virus) in 1985. At that time, any infant or toddler with a fever was a potential victim  of  meningitis due to H.Flu, which could be deadly or leave the child with neurological damage.

Similarly, the Hepatitis B vaccine made healthcare a less risky occupation; Hepatitis B is a blood borne infection contracted from contact with infected blood.

VACCINE-PREVENTABLE DISEASES
FROM THE CDC, UPDATED JANUARY 2016– follow link for detail

So, I was  first surprised, then puzzled, then alarmed at the number of parents who reject vaccination for their children, and  adults who decline immunizations for themselves. Some people now fear the vaccines more than the diseases they prevent and we physicians must consider this to help people stay well instead of treating them when sick.

I was intrigued when I heard of a book, by a physician,that seems to promote a compromise-

The Vaccine-Friendly Plan

The Vaccine-Friendly Plan is published by Ballantine Books,  2016

The Vaccine-Friendly Plan by Paul Thomas, M.D., a pediatrician  and Jennifer Margulis, Ph.D.a science journalist.

It is based on his pediatric practice, Integrative Pediatrics,  as well as their extensively noted references. The book’s subtitle summarizes the contents accurately-

“Dr. Paul’s Safe and Effective Approach to Immunity and Health- from Pregnancy through your Child’s Teen Years.”

The book discusses pregnancy, infant and  child care in general, not just vaccination, although that is a major emphasis.There is a chapter about pregnancy and for each stage of child development through adolescence.

The first chapter discusses a popular health topic now- toxins. (As an aside, I don’t know when we started calling poisons  “toxins”) . This should grab your attention-

“Toxins, Toxins, Toxins: Raising Healthy Children in a Poisoned World”.

Anything can be “toxic” if misused, overused,or abused  but they concentrate on these toxins in particular- acetaminophen, aluminum, aspartame, fluoride, methanol, mercury, and what they call endocrine disruptors(this includes pesticides).  They state “environmental toxins are likely contributing to the autism epidemic” as well as other neurodevelopmental and mental disorders in children.  They base their conclusion on an extensive list of review articles from the medical and scientific that support their view (obviously) and also from Dr. Paul’s medical practice of 11,000 children who he calls “among the healthiest in the world.” While I suspect  families who are already health conscious tend to select a physician who is health oriented, this claim sounds impressive.

I agree with some of the advice the authors offer. For example this advice for pregnancy is hard to argue with-

  • Eat a whole foods, organic, non-GMO diet 
  • Skip the soda
  • Drink filtered water
  • Minimize stress
  • Get treatment for addiction
  • Join a support group

But in addition, they recommend declining all vaccinations during pregnancy, certainly not mainstream medicine advice.

A later chapter also offers sound advice:

“ The Best Ways to Support your Child’s Immune System” 

  • Breast feed
  • Enjoy cuddling
  • Laugh a lot
  • Relax often
  • Rock your body
  • Stay hydrated
  • Eat a variety of foods
  • Maintain social connection
  • Read
  • Get Dirty
  • Be cautious but not afraid
  • Choose vaccines based on real science, your family’s needs and common sense
  • Sleep enough
  • Trust your children
  • Trust yourself

He offers an interesting list  Ten Questions to Ask When Looking for a Pediatrician (which I assume would apply if you use a family physician for your child’s care).

As a physician, I have never liked the idea of being “interviewed” by a potential patient; I  want a relationship with patients, not a job. But I think pediatricians routinely offer “get acquainted” visits so you may find it helpful. Some of the questions seem more appropriate to explore  in a long term relationship with a physician, not quick answers in a short visit, like “What would you like me to know in order to keep my family healthy?”

An appendix compares the CDC immunization schedule of 1983 to the current 2016 version, illustrating  many more vaccines and doses are now recommended.

Of course the list is longer since several new vaccines have been developed in the past 30 years and the CDC recommends those considered necessary for the public health. Most areas of medical care have changed dramatically in the past 30 years, we have a lot more of everything-drugs, procedures, etc- so this should not be a surprise.

vaccines
CDC Immunization Schedule– follow link for detail

Also in the appendix is Dr. Paul’s Vaccine Plan at a Glance, which is a much abbreviated version of the CDC recommendations. The plan is offered free at his web site drpaulapproved.com by signing up to receive his newsletter. (There is also a “store” on the web site offering an assortment of vitamins, minerals, probiotics and melatonin.)

The authors describe themselves as “pro-vaccine”, have received vaccines themselves and vaccinated their children. But they also believe that physicians and parents should have a choice and make informed decisions about immunization and other procedures. 

Universal vaccination is recommended , but there are individual circumstances where the routine schedule might need to be altered due to a child’s particular medical circumstance, but not for some vague concern that vaccination might not b e “safe”. Neither is infectious disease.

If  you are a parent who has  rejected vaccination for your children,  please read this book soon.

Also, read another review of this book by  Vincent Iannelli, MD , a pediatrician and Fellow of the American Academy of Pediatrics.

Sonia Shah, a science journalist, also wrote about vaccination in her book

Pandemic – Tracking contagions from cholera, to Ebola, and beyond

Read my review at this link Pandemic- a book review

Pandemic by Sonia Shah

another post on this topic
person getting vaccinated

Vital questions you should ask about immunization

This coronavirus pandemic is serious. We don’t yet have a vaccine or effective treatments. To protect ourselves, our familes, and our entire communities we should all be practicing social distancing and other hygiene measures as we wait for a safe, effective vaccine and treatments.

exploring the HEART of preventing disease

a stethoscope, a red heart and a heart ekg tracing
exploring the HEART of HEALTH

Thanks for following this blog. If you’re visiting, I would love for you to start following Watercress Words : use the form to get an email notification of new posts. Don’t worry, you won’t get anything else from me. I also want you to find and follow me on Facebook, Pinterest , Instagram, and LinkedIn .

                              Dr. Aletha